New York Wanderings: Fort Johnston and the Mohawk Valley

Driving along I-87 through the Adirondacks you come upon names of towns like Elizabethtown, Saranac and the lake, North Hudson, Schroon Falls, and Warrensburg and Lake George. I saw a sign for Lake Placid and Lake Luzerne.

My goal was Johnstown and so I headed out of Warrensburg after getting some gas and checking the oil.

The fog was starting to let up, well not really, and I was soon in Saratoga Springs which I found to be a very wonderful town and really liked the main street area that I saw before I turned west onto Hwy 29.  I suggest Google Images to see sites of this very lovely town. Just put the name of something you want to see into the search engine then click on images.  You can then follow and image out to its original page if you like.

This highway took me through the towns of North Milton, East Galway, Galway and North Galway, Honeywell Corners and Broadalbin.  It was at Broadalbin that I turned south on Hwy 30 and just decided to go into Amsterdam to Hwy 5.  It was easier than what I originally had planned.   Hwy 30 took me through Perth.  Yes another Perth and we are seeing some interesting names of towns in this area.

I followed Hwy 30 through Amsterdam and onto Hwy 5 heading west. This Hwy 5 follows the Mohawk River.  No luck today for photos it was all shrouded in FOG! and the railroad tracks sort of pushed the highway away from the river…darn!  So go to Google Images for some really cool views of this river, maps and all kinds of great stuff.

The town of Fort Johnson came up quickly but it was a little confusing to find the fort itself.  I saw a sigh and turned off by Park Row and then reread the sign and went back out on Hwy 5 till I got to the turn for Hwy 67 going north and there was the Fort right there on the left.  I turned right onto Hwy 67 and pulled into the parking lot.

The bridge to the Fort

The bridge to the Fort

 

The stream beneath the Bridge

The stream beneath the Bridge

The outhouse…no not the bathrooms.

An Historic Privy

A Historic Privy

 http://www.oldfortjohnson.org/

The Visitor Center at Fort Johnson

The Visitor Center at Fort Johnson with a great book shop

Fort Johnson

Fort Johnson – a very large house with many rooms, a large hall area, basement and full attic.

I signed in at the book register, paid $4 for the tour and wandered their book shop which had excellent books.

These CD's look comprehensive?

These CD’s look comprehensive?

Fort Johnson Sign

Fort Johnson Sign along Hwy #5

Fort Johnson is a fortified house with gun ports.  I have read about this type of house in regards to the history of the Goss family.  Philip Goss had a house probably similar that he built-in Huntington Twp. in Pennsylvania.

Mr. Johnson loved big houses and this was huge with large rooms and several floors including a useable attic where he held conferences with the Indians. When Sir Johnson moved to Johnstown his son Sir John Johnson took over this house.

I had a great tour of the Fort and the nice docent answered my questions about the history of the fort and the lives of the Johnson family.  I learned he was Irish and that was very interesting.  He didn’t like his sons first choice of a wife so he intervened to try to arrange a better marriage for John.  Sir John Johnson was a son of William and his first wife.

Here are some links to investigate.  At some point I am going to have to select really good links for Loyalist research I have some but at the moment I am experimenting and exploring.

I visited Sir John’s house in Glengarry on my last trip to Ontario in 2012.  I wrote about that visit here in post dated June 26, 2012:  Touring Glengarry:  Glengarry Archives & the Sir John Johnson House.  Sir Johnson really didn’t live in this house that much or at all, he lived in Quebec and died there.  http://100objects.qahn.org/content/gravestone-sir-john-johnson-1830

Sir William Johnson was a Baronet and had lots of land.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_William_Johnson,_1st_Baronet

This article is about Sir John Johnson the son: http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/johnson_john_6E.html

Mohawk Valley Region Path Through History:  http://www.mohawkvalleyhistory.com/

The Valley Dwellers:  http://www.mohawkvalleyhistory.com/

Sir John Johnson, son of William, had to take the people from the Mohawk Valley to Canada and he did this by going through the Adirondack Mountains in about 1778.  I plotted this route he took based on the article and it was right through the mountains.  I wondered why he would do that but it probably kept the people from being harrassed by the “Rebels.”

http://www.historyinanhour.com/2011/12/19/sir-john-johnson-summary/

This is very interesting as to what happened to the people who settled this area and then had to leave because they were Loyalists who believed in the Crown.

See this article: http://hortonsarticles.org/hh7thousand.htm

Electric Scotland has this great article about the Highlanders who came to the Mohawk Valley. http://www.electricscotland.com/history/highlands/chapter8.htm

This is a historical account of the Settlement of Scotch Highlanders in America by J. P. MacLean:

http://books.google.com/books?id=Xxem9Kqd0j0C&pg=PA230&lpg=PA230&dq=Sir+William+Johnson+and+the+highlanders&source=bl&ots=64nWDJ94oW&sig=xH0RLS3xeth_JY947KoS0zxE9Xs&hl=en&sa=X&ei=ojoxVJvfEeHWiwLTioGQDA&ved=0CEUQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=Sir%20William%20Johnson%20and%20the%20highlanders&f=false

 

About BJ MacDonald

Interested in travel, really into genealogy and researching my family history, classic novels and movies, fantasy and science fiction, photography, history and more... Here is a tip. Make sure you are commenting on the blog you were visiting and the post you were interested in. My blogs are listed by hovering over my pictures and clicking. Clicking one of them will take you back to the correct blog. You can try me here: bjmcdonell@gmail.com
This entry was posted in Ireland & England, Johnstown, MCDONALD/MACDONALD etc., Mohawk Valley, New York, Scotland, Trip to Ontario & Canada 2014 and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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