Ontario Wanderings: The Brockville Museum & Leeds Grenville Branch of the OGS

September 30, 2014

I came home on Sunday September 28th and still have much to share about the remainder of my trip.  So keep reading.

Canada’s Highway 2 is a wonderful road.  I get to see the country side.  I was contemplating taking 401 but decided “NAH” it was more fun to do Hwy 2.  So from Kingston I headed east on Hwy 2 to Brockville. This time I didn’t do the Thousand Island Parkway road after Gananoque which meant I would be more in the country and the road would not get close to the St. Lawrence till it got to Brockville.  I did take the Thousand Island Parkway when I went this way in 2012 so if you wanted to read about it you could do so on this blog and it is when I fell in love with the St. Lawrence River.

Once I found the Brockville Museum, I went in search of food and found Bud’s on the Bay.  I had a nice fettucine with Shrimp.  It was very good.  Bonnie was in Brockville at Buds on the Bay….giggle…Silly me.

The Brockville Museum houses the Leeds & Grenville Branch of the OGS and they were opened at 1 pm.  At the museum’s front door I went to the right and into the next room turning left and then another left down steep stairs into the small area that is the Leeds and Grenville room.  I was greeted by Patti and she had a surprise for me.  http://www.leedsandgrenvillegenealogy.com/

The Brockville Museum

The Brockville Museum

Entrance to the museum

Entrance to the museum

On the table was Part IV, Duncan MacDonald’s collection of genealogical charts.  See my blog post on this blog dated September 2, 2014 “Sources to use for Untangling McDonell, MacDonald, MacDonell & McDonald families…”  In this post I listed 5 books that Mr. Duncan Darby MacDonald created and here is the one I am most interested in.

4.  **A collection of genealogical charts  Part-IV, 3rd Edition, ISBN O-921133-39-1.  Much of the earlier work done by Daniel F. McDonald of Bristol, Conn and other members of his family at Bridgend (Stone Villa) Lancaster.  A second edition was published in 1988 and the 3rd in 1993.  FHL#971.37 D2, book only.   

Patti and I chatted for a while about how the immigrants got from Quebec City to Montreal to various areas of Ontario and she said they could disembark at Prescott, Brockville, Kingston and even Toronto.  The Loyalists would usually settle by regiment.  Another person had told me that if you know the lot and concession number that is another piece of the puzzle.

The family histories

The family histories

I did not have much time so I proceeded to study the pages I was most interested in Chart #13 and made a quick list of the other charts that where referenced.  Then I started looking for those charts in the book which is very thick and took pictures.  Now I am probably not done with the book because those new charts may have other references.  Therefore, when I get back home I will need to get busy and study all this information.  I left one of my McDonald Booklets based on this blog with Patti for the collection.

Part IV Genealogical Charts.

Part IV Genealogical Charts.

Around 3 pm I packed up and headed out.  When I was there the last time a storm was brewing so I took a few minutes to take some new pictures of the little park and marina near the museum.

The St. Lawrence River at Brockville

The St. Lawrence River at Brockville

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The main street in Brockville

The main street in Brockville

I took Hwy 2 again and I passed through Prescott, Johnstown, Cardinal, Iroquois, Morrisburg, past the Upper Canada Village, Ingleside and Long Sault.  I had driven this route in 2012 and kept hearing about the St. Lawrence Seaway and didn’t realize the impact that this had on the area.

Long Sault has the Lost Villages Museum http://lostvillages.ca/  The creation of the St. Lawrence Seaway flooded many villages and the inhabitants had to move.  The day was July 1, 1958 when the water was released.  The website gives a list of the cities and what happened.

The St. Lawrence Seaway: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Lawrence_Seaway


Brockville: A quick Visit!

June 22, 2012

Brockville is a town along the St. Lawrence that is quite charming.  The 1000 Island Parkway ends a little to the west of Brockville and if you aren’t careful you will end up on the major highway 401.

http://www.brockvilletourism.com/

I took Brockmere Cliff Drive just in time before I came to 401.  It is a right turn after E. Townline Rd. I almost missed it.  This road meets up with Hwy 2 and that takes you into Brockville. 

Entering Brockville

I found the Brockville Museum and parked my car and was surprised to find it open.  I didn’t dally because I had to keep moving.  My plan was to have dinner at the Upper Canada Village which closed at 5 pm and time was slipping by.  http://www.brockvillemuseum.com/museum/

The Brockville Museum

Next to the museum was the marina and a nice little park where I could watch the boats out on the St. Lawrence River.   Storm clouds are collecting!

Brockville Marina

Boats out on the river.

Boats out on the St. Lawrence

Geese were also enjoying the water.

The St. Lawrence next to the Brockville Marina

Downtown Brockville’s main square and I wish I had more time to explore!

The Main Square in Brockville, Ontario

Brockville was the home of Duncan Darby Macdonald and the MacDonald Research Centre.  Duncan did a great many books on Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry and lots of charts and compilation of various families including McDonalds.  He died awhile back but his collection is with Global Genealogy.  A great many of his works are with the Family History Library and many other archives, libraries and genealogical societies.  They spell his name in a variety of ways and it can get confusing.

http://globalgenealogy.com/globalgazette/gazed/gazed139.htm

 

 

 


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