Jack McDonald succumbs – 1949

October 11, 2012

3rd version: Jack with his sibling and nieces

Here is another photograph like the ones I featured in the last post.  This time Jack has a straw hat on and he is standing in between his two siblings.

LtoR: Vivian, Nellie, Jack, R.S., Miriam.  If you study the photo and focus on Jack and R.S. you can see some resemblance.

Jack gave me quite a challenge regarding his death.  I could not find any evidence of his passing in the International Falls records.  I finally figured it out.  The reason was he died in Moose Lake, Carlton Co., Minnesota on the 11th of December 1949.

Carlton Co. at Moose Lake in the State Hospital. Residence was Koochiching Co., International Falls, 983 Sixth St. Length of stay in the hospital 9 mos, 8 days. Full name: John A. McDonald, male, white, married. Spouse Sarah McDonald, her age 76, Dated of his birth Jan. 14, 1869, he was 80 years 10 mos and 27 days. occupation: Janitor. Born in Chichester, Quebec, Canada. Father’s name Archibald McDonald, born in Canada. Mother maiden name Sarah McDonald born in Canada. Funeral Director – James F. Morine, Duluth, MN. Died December 11, 1949 – arteriosclerosis and senility etc.

Source:  Death Certificate, John A. McDonald, #1983, Reg. No. 155, Moose Lake, Carlton Co., Minnesota, Dec. 11, 1949, State of Minnesota Vital Statistics, Minnesota Historical Society Death Certificates.

Note:  The date given for his birth is Jan 14, 1869.  The St. Alphonsus Church records have January 3, 1869?  They also have Sarah as his mother and it should be Mary.  His tombstone reads 1870.  His death certificate gives the Jan 14th date.  Also the number for the house he lived in might be a little off.

John A. 1870 to 1949

There is an obituary article from the The Daily Journal of International Falls, dated December 12, 1949. It reads:

“John A. McDonald, 903 Sixth street, one-time mayor of International Falls and a resident of the community since 1904, died Sunday at the age of 70. He passed away at an out-of-town hospital after an illness of more than two years. Time and place of funeral services will be announced in a later issue of the Journal. The Green Mortuary will be in charge. Familiarly known as “Jack,” Mr. McDonald served one two-year term as major from 1922 to 1924. Prior to being elected to the No. 1 office in the municipality he represented Ward III on the city council for four years. He was also one of the first members of the Falls fire department and maintained an active interest in the organization until he resigned in 1941 because of his health. Mr. McDonald was well-known to thousands of children whom he encountered in his work as fireman-engineer at Alexander Baker school. He joined the school custodian staff in 1913, shortly after the AB building was constructed. Upon his retirement in 1945 he had 32 years of school service to his credit. Born in Chapeau, Quebec, Jan. 14, 1869, Mr. McDonald emigrated to the United States as a young man in 1901 and settled in Bemidji. The same year he was married to Miss Sarah M. Burns, who survives. The couple moved to International Falls in 1904 and Mr. McDonald soon established a dray line, which he operated until 1913. In the latter years he joined the school building staff. Surviving, in addition to his widow, are a daughter, Mrs. Gilbert (Mary) Louiseau, and a brother, Alex, both of International Falls.”

This obituary notice really gives a great overview of Jack’s life.

He is buried with his family in the Forest Hill Cemetery which includes the St. Thomas Cemetery.  The burial site is dominated by this large tombstone with McDonald on it. If I recall, I was told by the family, that Jack and Archie bought the plot and had this stone installed.

McDonald Tombstone


John (Jack) Archibald McDonald & Sarah M. Burns

July 20, 2012

One of the goals I had on my trip to Ontario and Quebec, was to try to find any reference I could about the marriage of John (Jack) McDonald and Sarah Maria Burns.  Jack, as he was called, is a son of Archibald and Mary McDonell.  There are other John Archibald McDonell/McDonalds in the area so you do have to be careful to not confuse them.

They were still in Chichester in 1901 according to the Canadian Census that had an enumeration date of March 31, 1901.

In the 1901 Canadian census for Chichester, Pontiac County, Quebec we find Mary and Archie still living in the area along with their son John (Jack).

McDonald, Archie, farmer, 63 years old. Birth date is October [5,] 1837. Place of birth is Canada, which is written over with Quebec. Racial origin is given as Scottish, nationality is Canadian. Religion is Catholic. He can read, write and speaks English. His mother tongue is English. McDonald, Mary, birth date is March 13 , 1840, 60 years old. McDonald, John birth date is June 16, 1872, he is 28 years old. 

Source:  1901 Canadian Census, Chichester, Pontiac Co., Quebec CC Film #T6538, 1800 Pontiac, pg. 116.  

The marriage was 20 August 1901 as written in the St. Alphonsus Catholic Church Record.

John and Sarah’s Marriage

Source:  Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection) 1621-1967 database, Chapeau, Parish, St. Alphonse, Pontiac County, Quebec.  Registres Photographies  Aug Greffe De Campbell’s Bay, No. 17,  20 August 1901.

Another source is the Marriages Du Comte De Pontiac:

Source:  Marriages Du Comte De Pontiac 1836-1973: McDonald, Pub. No. 26, Editions Bergeron & Fils Engr’, Montreal, P.Q. FHL #971.4215 K29.

pg. 356 #6916 McDonald, John Archibald (Archibald McDonald & Mary McDonald) 8/20/1901 to Sarah Burns (Geo.Burns & Cath. McMahon).

I tried the Pembroke newspaper published abstracts for vital records, but didn’t find any article about this marriage.

Births, Marriages and Deaths from the Pembroke, Ontario Newspapers Vol I. 1900-1906, Compiled by Members of the Upper Ottawa Valley Genealogical Group, 2003.

Elaine (Burns) Brown writes that the wedding party probably…

“…celebrated at the home of Sarah’s cousin Ida Coghlan’s parents (Margaret) Ida Coghlan was the daughter of Ellen and James Coghlan.  Ellen was Catherine (McMahon) Burn’s sister.”  Ida is a witness to the marriage.

I was planning on looking at the actual Pembroke newspaper but didn’t have time to go to the Pembroke Public Library or at UVOGG.  I had made plans to visit Library and Archives Canada in Ottawa, and had requested the Pembroke newspapers.  When I arrived on Monday, May 28th they had the other newspaper films I had ordered but for some reason the Pembroke newspapers were missing.  Elaine reports that there was a break in the Pembroke newspaper from August 16, 1901 to January 3, 1902.  That is the critical time frame that I needed.  When reviewing the LAC information for the Pembroke newspaper I see that this break is there.  Still I did not get any Pembroke newspapers at the LAC.

Pembroke Observer.
NJ.FM.1018 F 1, 1867- 1898; 1900- Ag 16, 1901; Ja 3- Ag 22, 1902; 1906; 1913 AN 7158329 and AN 6945397

I also tried the Renfrew published newspaper abstracts for vital records but did not find anything of interest.  LAC has a nice listing of the volumes for the Mercury:  http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/journaux-chez-bac/035005-2209-e.html#ontario-renfrew-002

I did not study the Shawville newspapers at LAC because they didn’t have the timeframe I needed.  I did look at the McDonell/MacDonald/McDonald genealogical files at the Pontiac Archives in Shawville and didn’t find anything on the marriage.

At the Arnprior Archives I checked the newspaper abstracts for the Arnprior Watchman which are listed here:   http://www.adarchives.org/publications.htm

By doing this review of the local newspapers I learn the focus of that paper and eliminate possibilities.

The ultimate goal was to place the timeframe that Archibald, Mary, Jack and Sarah left Chichester for Minnesota.  Archie went back to Glengarry per Miriam’s notes so I would think he would do that before winter set in.  Did he go there after the wedding in August 1901?

The following picture is of Sarah, an unknown young girl, and Jack (John Archibald McDonell).  It was taken in International Falls about 1913.  This photograph was shared by Elaine (Burns) Brown.   On the right side panel of this blog under “Family History Websites of Interest” is the link a link to Elaine’s website:  Welcome:  Burns, Hughes, Somerville, Gentle.

UPDATE:  January 9, 2013 The unknown girl is found.  Please refer to the comments below on this post to learn the identify of this young girl.

Sarah, Unknown Girl, Jack McDonald


Ottawa and Gatineau Archives!

June 30, 2012

It was Thursday June 7,  2012 and I arrived in Ottawa around 5 pm.  My goal was the Albert House Inn on Albert Street just before Bronson. At the red light I managed to sneak this photo as I entered Wellington Avenue next to Elgin.  I have proof that this second visit was a beautiful sunny day and not a loud thunderstorm like on my first visit.

Wellington Street at Elgin

Getting to the Albert House Inn was not too hard till I got on Albert Street.  It is almost to Bronson and right before the Travelodge.  There is a little parking space at the front. I had to go around the block and when I came back I got my first and only honk from a local in Ontario or Quebec. HA!

Albert House Inn

Turning into their driveway is a little tricky for there is a big tree and it is narrow.  The parking is in the back and it is tight.  Fortunately a guest was just leaving so I got the best spot in the corner by the fence. 

The first floor

There is no entrance in the back to the inn.  You go to the front and up the very steep stairs through the front door.  Once inside the reception desk is to the right.  The attendant was very helpful and I was checked in quickly. She took me to my room on the 4th floor.  There is no elevator.  The staircases get shorter as you go higher.  She offered to help me bring my luggage in.  I took her up on it.  I also reduced the amount of luggage leaving my big piece in the car.  She carried the smaller one and put it in my room for me. 

My room was lovely with a big bed, a desk and a separate room for the toilet from the shower (tiny) and sink.  There was this very big screen TV in the room perhaps a little too big for the size of the room? They had one of the ductless heating and air-conditioners and I had to adjust it a little so it would not blow on me.  I had one window that was normal size and the other was 18 x 18 inches.  It had the best view.

My little window from my room on the 4th floor

Once I was settled in I headed out for dinner.  The Bay Street Bistro was just down the block on the other side of the street. I sat outside because it was a lovely warm day in Ottawa.  The next day it would be raining. While I was sitting there a large group of teenagers came to the entrance.  They had to send them through and by my table into the restaurant.  I think there were at least 30 of them.  My dinner was delicious and probably the 2nd best dinner on my trip. 

The Bay Street Bistro Al fresco

As I sat at the Bay Street Bistro, I noticed this cloud reflected in the building across from me.  

Reflections in glass

Breakfast was service in the basement of the Albert House Inn 5 levels down.  It is included in the room price. The first day Friday, the room was a little too crowded so I decided to get a cup of coffee and return to my room.  I did have breakfast later and it was delicious.  They do offer an assortment of food choices which is nice and they will cook you breakfast like pancakes or eggs.  Saturday the room was much better and I had a lovely chat with a man who was from British Columbia. 

Friday morning came and I had a decision to make. 

What archive would I visit?  There are more possibilities like cemeteries and church archives than the list below offers but it was what I was considering including a little sightseeing. 

1.  Library and Archives which was just a couple blocks away this time. I had been there for one day my first visit.  I could spend time in their Upper and Lower Canada land records microfilm which I believe is self-serve:  http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/index-e.html/

2.  The Ottawa Chapter of the Ontario Genealogical Society:  http://ogsottawa.on.ca/  They are at 100 Tallwood (near Baseline and Woodroffe). 

3.  The British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa:   http://www.bifhsgo.ca/ I have yet to jump the pond (Atlantic Ocean) but this might give me ideas. Also at 100 Tallwood. 

4.  The Ottawa Archives for the city of Ottawa are also at 100 Tallwood in Ottawa.  http://www.ottawa.ca/en/rec_culture/museum_heritage/archives/index.html

100 Tallwood, Ottawa

5.  The Ottawa Public Library, Cornwall Room http://biblioottawalibrary.ca/en/main/overview I could have studied their city directories for the other side of the family in search of Brown descendants.

6.  The Sir Carleton Branch of the UEL Association of Canada at 1547 Merivale Rd., Nepeau, Ontario. 

 7.  The Outaouais Regional Centre http://www.craoutaouais.ca/of the Bibliothèque et Archive Nationales Due Québec or as it is written on their website: Centre Régional D’Archives De L’Outaouais (CRAO) I have found that if I Google:  Outaouais Centre BAnQ it takes me to the main Bibliothéque et Archives Nationales Du Quebec website. 

8.  Société de généalogie de l’Outaouais (SGO):  http://www.genealogieoutaouais.com/

I decided to go to the Centre Régional D’Archives De L’Outaouais  in Gatineau and the Société de généalogie de l’Outaouais. Fortunately these two entities are at the same location and in the same room. 
 
It was not too hard to drive over to Gatineau.  I found my way by going around the block and north on Bay Street to Wellington to the Portage Bridge. Construction made it a little confusing as to the lane I was supposed to use. Once across the bridge you go under this very large building which I think is the government offices and proceeded north along the Blvd. Maisonneuve which turned into Blvd. Fournier and a little later on it became Gréber.  There was a blockage of construction and  I was forced to turn right onto Blvd. Maloney and Blvd. de la Gappe was one street over to the north. I believe I turned on Blvd. de “l’Hópital and right onto Blvd. de la Gappe.  I went east on de la Gappe till it ran out and turned left.  There are sign posts pointing the way. 
 
According to one website the building is called the Maison de la Culture de Gatineau. 

I had a little trouble online trying to find this archive but I can guarantee it is at this location.  If I recall there were several addresses for it and that is why it was confusing because I believe it moved.  The address: 855 boulevard de la Gappe, Gatineau (Québec) J8T 8H9, 819-568-8798 or 1 -800-363-9028.  Email: archives.gatineau@banq.qc.ca.   Time:  8 to 4:30 pm Monday through Friday.

The Centre and Society

The Centre Régional D’Archives De L’Outaouais (CRAO) is in the last building on Blvd. de la Cité to the left.  In other words, you go around the building to the north side.

There is a parking lot but you do have to park in certain rows (in the center) and obtain a permit if longer than 90 minutes (signs).  The SGO website has the form so you could download and fill it out to be ready. 

The building for the Outaouais Archive and more. From the parking lot looking toward Ottawa

When you enter the building do not go straight ahead or you will come to the public library for Gatineau-Bowater. 

The Archive is upstairs on the 2nd floor.  So go through the doors from the parking lot and turn left.  Proceed up the staircase or take the elevator to the 2nd floor.  Once on the 2nd floor go right and then left down the hallway.  Look for the two big yellow doors with the Room 211 sign.  There is a sign on the wall in the hallway but it is a bit confusing.  Go right.  The reader board in the lobby is confusing, go to the 2nd floor.

The Outaouais Archive of Quebec

This is when you need to make a decision.  To talk to the volunteer of the Société de généalogie de l’Outaouais or not.  It depends on whether you have French Canadian lineage or have English ancestors who settled in Quebec. My interests were anything to do with Pontiac County, Quebec.  

Apparently the man behind the large counter area did not speak English and he did have a sort of frightened look on his face when the lady who was helping me from the administrative offices took me to the Room 211.  I was confused as to where to go. She was very nice but also spoke little English. 

I was introduced to a volunteer for the genealogical society who had been seated at the desk in front of the big counter area.  

He started by telling me he did his “genealogy online and why was I there?” When I mentioned obtaining deeds he said “why?” I tried to talk to him but he just would not listen.  He didn’t realize that my McDonald booklet was for the archive so he left it on the desk.  When I approached the 2nd volunteer who had taken over later in the day.  I discovered this miscommunication and explained it was for the archive, he assured me it would be given to their president.  This means it was given to the society not the actual archive.  Since they share the space I am hopeful it will be available for access by all who use the facility?

How to use this facility to the best of my ability.

1.  Go here first.  It gives and overview description of what is at this archive and their partner the SGO: http://www.banq.qc.ca/collections/genealogie/ressources_documentaires_salle/centre_archive/centre_outaouais.html?language_id=1

2.  Study the database Pistard at BAnQ for what is at the Outaouais centre.  I do not know if the SGO’s collection is on this database.  http://pistard.banq.qc.ca/unite_chercheurs/recherche_simple

3.  Study the website links for CRAO and SGO which I gave above.

4.  Get your parking permit and make sure your car is parked correctly if you will be there longer than 90 minutes.

5.  Get a locker because you can’t take your computer case into the research room.  The lockers are in a small room outside the two big yellow doors of Room 211.   Do not loose your locker key.

6.  As them to give you a tour of the centre.  I didn’t do this and regret it.

7.  There are finding aids in the facility and they are located on the top of cabinets. 

8.  There are BAnQ brochures and I took even the French versions because they didn’t have any English out.  Again I should have asked if they had English versions somewhere. 

  • Guide du chercheur:  A square-shaped brochure has the facilities map in back.
  • Le guide de l’abonnement
  • Les services à distance
  • Bibliothéque et Archives Nationales du Québec
  • Les collections partimoniales et les fonds d’archives
  • This one was in English:  Guide to subscriptions

What follows is a map of the Outaouais Facility that is a little out of date but close to what was there. 

A map of the centre

You can only access the centre through the two big yellow doors at the bottom left of the map which is blue.  The locker room is labeled M.  It is outside in the hallway. 

Everything else is inside this centre – the blue area. Bathrooms in the hallway outside of the centre.

  • F is the audiovisual.  The door to the right is a hallway door to other offices?
  • E is the periodicals and magazines
  • A is slightly different and more circular now and has computers as well. 
  • This maps does not show the desk for the SGO.  It is right before the black strip in the corner beyond A on the bottom of the map.
  • C is the stacks of books. SGO’s collection is there and then the Archives is too but apparently they are in different locations in these stacks.  I was not clear about that.
  • D is where the family histories are.  The first row facing into the center of the room.  Also if memory serves they house the cemetery books?
  • B is the computers and desks.  I don’t remember the two tables between B and K.
  • Tables to sit at are over by the windows at the top a good 7 big tables.
  • G is a conference room
  • H is  Cabinets de Travail??
  • I Table lumineuse??
  • K is the maps and plans and table for consulting them
  • L is where the one and only copier is located.  Have change.  I don’t remember a copy card function.
  • J is the big microfilm and microfiche room with cabinets holding newspapers and more.
  • The big lime green area behind a big counter which is represented by the black strip in an L shape. In that is where the individual sits.  I believe he is the archivist or an assistant?  The other desks in the back I do not know what they are about. 

The SGO 2nd volunteer was very nice and pleasant.  He tried to help me find notary records on the stacks but he was not able to.  So that meant I had to wait for the archivist who had left and didn’t return for a very long time.  

When he did I asked him about notaries.  He did not speak English very well but I had written down what I wanted.  I figured he could read English.  He read my notes and was off to his desk to obtained a copy of an index of Notaries. It was a copy of a very large index book but only looked like it was the pages for this area. I will talk about this in a future post.

As I was copying a researcher was stacking books by the copier.  She spoke to me in French and I said I was almost done and she immediately apologized and said she didn’t realize I didn’t speak it.  She was very nice and I was tempted to ask her about the centre.

I studied their family histories in the D area and didn’t find anything on McDonald or is various spellings.

My visit was not the best but at least I had a visual idea of the archive and I could go from there.  I was tired and my level of patience was gone.  However, I do think that this centre needs to work on their customer service.

I headed back the way I came and found a McDonald’s on Maisonnneuve.  I ordered my lunch and the young lady who served me said something to me in French that I interpreted as “enjoy.”  It was not Bon Appetit.  I read the Ottawa paper in English while I listened to French radio and TV.  I was happy.

I targeted  the Parc Jacques-Cartier on Rue Laurier to see if I couldn’t get a picture of Ottawa from that side of the river.  I was right I could see Ottawa from their parking lot.

Ottawa from the parc in Gatineau

Another view a little more to the east.  The weather had improved.

Looks like a fortress

I returned to the Albert Street Inn, parked the car and headed to my room on the 4th floor. HA!  I was back out on the street in no time to go for a walk and find some dinner.  I really needed a good glass of wine. The Bay Bistro was a possibility but it was still a little damp from the day’s rain and I wanted to explore Ottawa one more time.  I headed for Slater Street part of which is a mall area.  I featured it in one of my posts of Ottawa.

I had not intended to go all the way to D’Arcy McGee’s but I did. So I decided to have my last dinner in Ottawa at this establishment and hoped that the rain would not send us scrambling. At first it was very cold and I thought I should go inside but all of a sudden the wind stopped and I was fine.

A threatening cloud over D’Arcy McGees

On the way back I went over to Wellington and walked along enjoying the Parliament buildings. This following picture is taken at that time.

The cloud was still making things very dark over the capital building.

This picture was taken several weeks ago when I visited Ottawa the first time.  The building on the right has scaffolding.  By the time I returned to Ottawa it was all the way to the top.  See the photo from D’Arcy McGees above.

The capital building the first visit to Ottawa

Saturday June 9, 2012 was my last day in Canada for now.  It was time to checkout, pack up and head to the airport.  

I did try to go to the Ottawa Chapter of the OGS but the building was closed for regular maintenance.  Well, I had changed my plans so you can expect this type of problem.  I was not that disappointed.  See the picture above for 100 Tallwood.

So I spent most of my time at Digby’s Restaurant on Bank St. below Heron waiting, relaxing and reading my NookColor.  The waitress was okay with my dithering and around 1:30 pm I paid my bill and headed to the Ottawa Airport via the Airport Parkway and started remembering leaving the airport my first day. 

I followed the signs to the car rental return.  They don’t have those gates with the big teeth on the ground.  I turned in the Dodge Caliber at Hertz and was told I had done 2117 miles.  This was a record. No wonder I was tired. HA!

At ticketing I had to adjust the weight of my large luggage bag it was 57 lbs. and she refused to accept it.  So I put some things in the smaller one and adjusted it and I made it but it meant I had to carry some items with me and that was going to be tiring.  Usually I ship things back home saving me this problem but I was a little afraid it was going to cost a lot. 

The next hurdle was customs.  No problem I was through in a snap.  I had made a list of the things I had purchased so I had something to work with.  Security was also easy and I was soon at the gate.  It is not that far to the gates at the Ottawa Airport. 

Ottawa Airport Gate area

The plane was not full from Ottawa to Chicago.  As we took off I said “Good Bye” to Ontario and looked forward to getting home to my kitties.  In Chicago they changed the gate 4 times and once from C to B for my flight to Seattle.  My sister picked me up at the airport and I walked in the door at 12 midnight.

Home Sweet Home!  I think I was homesick this trip!


Kingston: Anglican Archive, Visit with a Friend & the OGS

June 21, 2012

Friday June 1, 2012 was going to be a very busy day. 

My first appointment was with the Anglican Diocese office in downtown Kingston.  This was regarding my Brown family research.  The Browns were Church of England and I was hoping to find out more about William Brown my 3rd great-grandfather.  I was in luck I did find his death and burial information.  See the blog: The Boardmans and Browns of Winnipeg. for more information about this trip.  http://boardmanbrown.wordpress.com/

Anglican Diocese Building, Kingston

After I finished up at the Diocese office I headed back to my B&B and waited impatiently for Elaine to arrive. 

Years ago I was reading an online mailing list for the Upper Ottawa Valley and this person by the name of Elaine Brown was sharing information about the various churches and church registers for the area.  I learned that she had compiled a book covering the deaths and burials at the cemetery in Chapeau for the St. Alphonsus Church.  I emailed her and bought a copy.  It was with me on this trip.  We have since shared information and information on McDonalds and Burns families in the area.  My great uncle John (Jack) McDonell married Sarah Burns and she was curious about there marriage.  I visited their daughter on several occasions in International Falls and put Elaine in touch with her.  Sadly Mary died several years ago about two months before I made my third trip to Minnesota. 

Elaine’s family history website:  http://www.personainternet.com/etbrown/burns.htm 

Elaine’s book:  http://www.personainternet.com/etbrown/alphonse.htm

Aunt Lucy’s in Kingston & Rain

Elaine and I were going to have lunch together and meet for the first time face-to-face.  The Briar Patch was no longer offering lunch so she took me to Aunt Lucy’s.  We were together from 12:30 to 4:30 pm or so.  It was a rainy day in Kingston (just like home) but we didn’t care for we were busy talking and sharing and having a great time.  I had so much fun I had dessert.  Elaine really knows a lot about genealogy in Canada and so I am very grateful to her for sharing and caring about a stranger from that country to the south.  HA!  Thanks for lunch Elaine, my treat next time. 

St. Lawrence College – Location of the OGS Conference 2012

The Ontario Genealogical Society (OGS) Conference started at 5 pm with a barbecue and so I parted with Elaine but was feeling very happy and content. 

The rain had moved the dinner inside so we were all gathering in the cafeteria of the St. Lawrence College for the OGS Conference “Borders and Bridges 2012,”  Several ladies came and sat at my table and we chatted about the conference, our research and where we were from.  As usual people are all surprised when they realize that I am from the other Washington located on the western side of the continent. http://www.ogs.on.ca/conference2012/

Registration was open so I stopped by to get my bag of goodies and a USB drive of the syllabus:

Registration OGS 2012

The opening ceremonies were done with pomp.  They had a fully costumed town crier which I understand is an award wining town crier.

The Opening of the Borders and Bridges, OGS Conference 2012

The next day the conference was in full swing starting about 8 am with the opening address.  I didn’t get there till later and cruised the vendors.  I was happy to see the Quebec Family History Society, Lambton County Genealogical Society and more.  I was very strong and didn’t buy too many books.  I had a nice chat with Coleen Fitzpatrick the author of the Forensic Genealogy.  She was telling me about autosonal testing for women opening up more possibilities.  I have been really considering DNA testing. I have a family member whom I would like to test but so far there is resistance.  I purchased her book:  DNA & Genealogy.  http://www.forensicgenealogy.info/

Vendors about to open Saturday June 2, 2012 OGS Conference

The lectures started about 11 am.  I attended several lectures about newspaper research and each lecture gave me more information about sources I had not tried.  John D. Reid gave “Your Family History in Canadian and British Newspapers. He was explaining the OCR and why it was not yet to a place where it could read all the letters efficiently.  He explained that some websites had better OCR technology than others.  He said to take your time and try different searched.   Meldon J. Wolfgang III gave “Extra! Hear All About it! Exploring Some New and Less Familiar Pathways in Newspaper Research.  He had some really interesting sources to use.  He is the man in the picture below.  Evelyn Kolish also gave an excellent lecture:  “Court Records Across the Border: How to Find Your Way Among Quebec’s Court Records.”  Slowly I am gaining confidence with researching in Quebec. 

Lecture on Newspaper sources

Everyone was wondering where the banquet would be held.  Well it was in the cafeteria and it was sort of amazing to see how they transferred it into a festive affair.  We were told that over 500 people were in attendance.  The banquet room was filled to capacity.  Susan de Groot of the Ontario Chapter of the Association for Professional Genealogists was attending the conference.  Susan and I have met several times at various conferences and she remembered me.  She kindly invited me to her table.  She is the owner of Windmill Genealogy Services.

Those seated at the table were John Reid of the British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa was present.  He gave the one of the lectures on newspaper research that I mention above.  Lisa Louise Cooke of Genealogy Gems sat with us.  She had been busy with lectures all day. Lisa had come all the way from California to attend the conference.  David Obee was present.  I have one of his books that he co-wrote with Sherry Irvine on Canadian Research.  The conversation was lively and interesting. 

Oh, yes they toasted the Queen and I found that very sweet. 

Banquet settings

The lectures started early Sunday morning, June 3, 2012 with the one I was looking forward to.  It was on Quebec land records titled “Digging up Genealogy Gems:  Quebec Land Records,” by Sharon Callaghan who I believe is also active in the Quebec Family History Society in La Pointe, Quebec:  http://www.qfhs.ca/  Her lecture was excellent and I was pleased. 

I decided to take another turn about the vendors and see what other things I could discover.  It actually took me a good hour and half to review them.  So it was almost time for lunch and since I had a ticket I decided to wait and get my sandwich.  When they set out the sandwiches I decided to stay and eat my lunch and again had a lovely conversation with several conference goers who sat down at my table.  I had my Nook Color reader with me, so I gave them an overview. 

Lectures would continue and then they would have a closing address later on in the day but I had to move on.  It was time to head to Cornwall and visit the Glengarry area.


Pembroke, Ontario: The Upper Ottawa Valley Genealogical Group & Library

June 15, 2012

It was Thursday, May 24, 2012 and the Upper Ottawa Valley Genealogical Library was open from 12-4 pm (also on Tuesdays 12-4 and the 3rd Saturday of the month).  I had been looking forward to visiting this archive having been a member of the online list for many years.  It would be a special day because I would be meeting a McDonald cousin who happened to be the librarian at the UOVGG library. 

There sign that is out in the back when open!

The UOVGG is located on the southwest corner of Dickson and Maple Street in Pembroke.  They are housed in the basement of the Masonic Lodge which a big building that dominates the corner.  You have to go into the parking lot and look at the back of the building to see the double doors to enter.

The entrance doors to UOVGG

 

The big Masonic Lodge

I went down some stairs and through some doors into this hallway and then I turned right into a large room with tables and was greeted by my cousin Diane Burnett, Librarian.  She said “You must be Bonnie.”  I said “Yes, I am.”

The main research area of the UOVGG

It was not to long before we were talking away and chatting about research.  She is the one who encouraged me to dig further into a John McDonell in Sheen. This is her family.  She had found this very blog and made a comment and that is the beginning of our getting to know each other. 

As a result of her comment on my blog, I did a census study using John and Julia’s daughter Teresa who married a Hugh Downey and went to Saskatchewan.  I traced back and ended up with John’s family.  John is the brother to my Archibald McDonald.  See my posted March 31, 2012 “A Discovery: Archie’s brother John McDonell, living next door in Sheen?”  I had visited the grave of John and Julia McDonell at the St. Paul the Hermit Cemetery in Sheen and posted about it just recently.  Diane is very generous and has given me a print out of her research which will be devoured when I get the chance.

The Upper Ottawa Valley Genealogical Group is awesome.  I was very happy there and realized I probably should have planned several days digging into their holdings but I would content myself with the hours available.  My the time I left I would have a better idea of what they had in their holdings, the knowledge of the volunteers and the visual experience. 

Here is their website which has a lot of information and is very helpful: http://www.uovgg.ca/

One of the volunteers is working diligently on rescuing the McDonald Burying Ground which is between Renfrew town and Cobden from Hwy 17.  It is to the west up the hill on Sutherland Road.  There are only a few stones left in this cemetery.  This website has photographs of the few remaining stones. 

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~murrayp/renfrew/westmeat/mcdonal/index.htm 

At the UOVGG there is a bulletin board as you enter the main work area where they have placed articles and information and further research regarding the McDonald’s who are buried there.  This volunteer who is quite the character and was teasing me about east and west, has just received a grant that will allow him to place a commemorative monument at the site of this burying-ground and more.  I was interested in this Scottish McDonald family but learned they were Presbyterian and not Roman Catholic.  Which is a very important aspect of the research in this area. It will probably be a good six months before the dedication ceremony but I am sure you can contact UOVGG for further information. 

REQUEST:  If you have family that came from Renfrew and Pontiac County, please consider taking a few minutes to submit your family history to the Upper Ottawa Valley Genealogical Society either by mail or via email as an attachment.  Their holdings emphasize Renfrew County but they do have holdings for Pontiac County and other areas as well.  I submitted my family history booklet of the McDonald’s that is a condensed version of this blog, so why don’t you do the same?  

I was asking Diane one of my many questions.  “Why doesn’t Chichester have a history or book?”  She replied because it didn’t have a church.” 

Sheen as the “Crosses and Shamrocks” two-volume booklets about the St. Paul the Hermit and the St. Theresa of the Little Flower (Fort William) churches along with an appendix of family charts of the families of Sheen. 

The Appendix part of this two-volume publication

Allumette Island has the two volumes of the Family and Descendants of L’Isle-aux-Allumettes of which I copied some of the information.  

Book 2 of the Allumette publication

Well, my reply was “Humph!” 

Yes, the wheels are turning in my head.  That has already began to change because of this very blog you are reading.  The townships of Allumette, Chichester and Sheen are featured in these posts. 

I am now officially a member of UOVGG and took home my membership card.  I received a very fat packet of information.  They provided a description of where things are in the library: #1 Quebec Holdings, #2 Family Histories and Biographies, #3 Miscellaneous, #4 How to books, #5 BMD’s, #6 Cemeteries for Renfrew Co., #7 Oversized Books, #8 Census Transcriptions, #9 Renfrew Co. Towns, Townships, Villages, #10-11 Exchange Newsletters, #12 British Isles, #13-15 Ontario Cemetery Transcriptions, #16 Maps, #17 Current Exchange Letters, #18 Pedigree Charts, #19 Computer and databases, #20 & #23 Microfilms and fiche.  Please consult their website for more details.

I am very thankful for all the help and the friendly reception form the volunteers.  I believe I amused them with my USA perspective. HA!

It was quite a busy and crazy four hours at the UOVGG library.  People were coming and going.  I was asking Diane tons of questions and she was trying to find me answers.  As usual time flew by and it was all over before it began.  I am glad I visited.


Hwy. 148: The Quebec Side by the Outaouais River

June 15, 2012

Bryson, Grand Calumet Island, Campbell’s Bay, Litchfield, Vinton and Waltham are only a few of the towns and hamlets along Hwy. 148.  This highway follows the Ottawa river or Outaouais River as it is called in Quebec.  To my ear it is pronounced “Ootaway.”

I was following the gently curving highway when I saw the most curious thing.  A church without a spire?

St. Elizabeth of Hungary, in Vinton

You really can’t tell in my photograph but the spire is missing.  It actually is situated on the ground next to the church.  Apparently they are doing repairs.  It looked so strange to see this short square castle like tower. The church is one of the many wonderful stone churches in Canada.  Even I can tell that faith really is what settled Canada.  There is a most amazing cemetery next to the church of St. Elizabeth of Hungary.

The Cemetery by St. Elizabeth of Hungary, Vinton, Quebec

More of the cemetery, St. Elizabeth of Hungary, Vinton, Quebec

I continued on my way and came to Mansfield-et-Pontefract and Fort Coulonge.  A very curious amalgamation of two cities?  I didn’t dally to figure it out.  I turned left following the signs pointing to Fort Coulonge and past a huge cemetery on my left.  I came to Rue Principale and followed that along the Coulonge River.  This road took me to the “Félix Gabriel-Marchand Bridge.  I stopped puzzled?

Marchand Cover Bridge, Fort Coulonge, Quebec

After a little passage of time, I observed cars driving across this very long covered bridge from either side.  I reviewed the signs posted at the entrance and there was nothing saying I could not drive across.  So I did.  What a kick!  It was not flat but wavy so the car when slightly up and down as I drove across.  It was one lane so apparently the honor system is in place and if you spy another car on the other side you either go or give way.

The entrance inviting me to drive across the Marchand Bridge

The Outaouais Heritage WebMagazine has an article under Historic Landmarks that states the bridge (pont) is one of Quebec’s oldest.  http://outaouais.quebecheritageweb.com/article/marchand-covered-bridge-pontiac-giant  If you just Google this bridges name you will find a lot of information.

Once across I turned left onto Hwy. 148 and the George Bryson house was easily found on the right side of the road.  It looked like it was about to get a new paint job?  http://maisonbryson.com/index_en.html  I found this webpage which I thought was rather fascinating about the history of this house and a whole lot more:

George Bryson House, Fort Coulonge, Quebec

“The historiography about the Bryson House in Mansfield, Pontiac County, Quebec: http://www3.sympatico.ca/larry.kenney/brysonhouse.html

The Welcome sign for the Bryson House

I didn’t have time to dither so I continued on my way to Chute du Coulonge.  The turnoff is not too far up the road from the Bryson House.  Apparently I did not read the website very well because they charge a fee to enter the park.  http://www.chutescoulonge.qc.ca/aboutus.htm   I have to admit being yelled at in French was interesting. I was making my way to the falls when she stopped me from going any further. I felt bad for the attendant.  There was no one there except me.  So I did not see the falls and do not have photographs.  Check out their website it looks like there a many activities for families.  By the way getting to it is a little odd.  You drive the highway and then you eventually get to a gravel road and the signs are somewhat lacking but eventually you find the big sign telling you that the park is not far.  They do have a good-sized parking lot.

I continued on Hwy. 148 and past by Waltham.  I was tempted to turn into the town but decided I was getting hungry and too tired to really enjoy it.  So I pushed on to Pembroke where I had arranged for lodging.


Calumet Island, Pontiac County, Quebec

June 14, 2012

My original plan was to drive through Bryson but I didn’t do that.  This was my tour of the Quebec side of the Outaouais River.  I discovered another route, Chemin Wilson, that took be directly to the bridge that crosses to Calumet Island. 

What is it about a place that captures your imagination or charms you? 

Welcome sign to Grand Calumet

I had obsessed about getting around on this island but it turned out it was a no brainer. Silly me! 

From the bridge to Calumet Island

Another view from the bridge to Calumet Island

The Ottawa River on a beautiful day, from the bridge to Calumet Island

Anyway you just follow the highway, Chemin des Outaouais from the bridge and it curves around and comes very quickly to the little village of L’îlle-du-Calumet.  From the main land side at Campbell’s Bay, I had noticed that Calumet Island’s eastern side sloped upward to the crest of the island.  Again if I had more time and energy I would have explored more.  I contented myself with exploring just the southeastern part.

From the village on Calumet Island looking east to the Ottawa River

There was a lovely park with parking that faced the Outaouais River.  This is the eastern branch of the river that surrounds Calumet Island and is the gentler lazy side of the river.  I did not investigate the western side which I believe is where the rapids are and all the whitewater rafting takes place. 

I continued passed the village,L’îlle-du-Calumet,  for a good kilometre and I came upon the St. Anne Roman Catholic Cemetery.  Here I provide one photograph.  Sorry, it was getting late and I had more touring to do.

St. Anne’s Roman Catholic Cemetery, Calumet Island

There was another church with black stone in between the beige and white stones.  It was beautiful.  It was right in the village and behind it up on the hill was another cemetery and I am assuming that is the Grand Calumet Roman Catholic Cemetery.  Neither one of these cemeteries listed McDonald’s. 

The church with black stone, Calumet Island

I did park along the river’s edge in the park I mentioned and enjoyed the Outaouais river views.  In the distance was a church spire.  Ah…Campbell’s Bay.

Campbell’s Bay in the Distance

It almost seems like times stands still on Grand Calumet Island. 

I was curious about the Jean Cadieux legend and memorial.  I am always drawn to these types of stories.  Apparently the monument had been in a different location and got vandalized so it was moved closer to the village on the east side and just south of it.  I blazed right by on my way to the village my focus on the river, but found it on my way out.  There was a little half circle driveway that you could pull off the road to read the information board and view the memorial. I will let this website tell about his legend in both English and French: 

http://www.leveillee.net/ancestry/jeancadieux.htm

The Monument to Cadieux, Calumet Island

Looking east to the Ottawa River.

One last item, someone’s video of a tour of the island:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zu5ckcfi7u4

Even though my visit was short, I was glad I came…yes I was charmed.

Au Revoir!


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 29 other followers

%d bloggers like this: