St-Alexandre Des Chenaux RC Cemetery…Clarendon Twp.

November 21, 2014
St. Alexandre Cemetery

St. Alexandre Cemetery

One of the notes on Duncan D. MacDonald’s charts about Alexander McDonell and Janet caught my eye before I headed out on my trip to Canada in September 2014.  He wrote that they were buried in Stark’s Corner.  It was on Sheet 2-A, Chart 13 of his Part IV Collection of charts book.

I was at the Quebec Family History Society in Pointe-Claire, Quebec looking at their cemetery records for Pontiac County, Quebec and the volunteer pulled this three page typed paper and I got real excited.  This society has a great collection of cemetery records for Quebec.

I have been all over the Stark’s Corner Cemetery records at the Ontario Genealogical Society and also at the Quebec Family History Society and there is no record of any McD’s in this cemetery located in Clarendon Twp., Pontiac Co., Quebec.  This is also not a Catholic cemetery.

Source: Stark’s Corner Community Cemetery, including Stark Family Cemetery, Stark’s Corner United Church Cemetery also known as Stark’s Corner’s Presbyterian Church Cemetery. Recorded August 1991 by Robbie Gorr, Lot 20 A Range 3.  

Here is the link to the Grave Marker Gallery for Starks Corner with tombstone pictures.  There are no McD’s listed.

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cangmg/quebec/pontiac/clarendo/starksco/index.htm

Well…when the volunteer at the Quebec Family History Society pulled this manuscript, I knew it was Alexander and Janet…

Source:  St-Alexandre Des Chenaux Roman Catholic Cemetery (also known as Ste-Melanie de Clarendon Roman Catholic Cemetery). Lot 24, Range 1, Clarendon Twp., Recorded May 1992 by Robbie Gorr.  The title is: The Lone Sentinel of the Past:

Try the Grave Marker Gallery for photos:

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cangmg/quebec/pontiac/clarendo/stalexan/index.htm

This is a story of neglect and abandonment.  This cemetery was abandoned and subsequent owners have plowed up the area.  It is estimated that 100 wooden crosses were once there.  There is now only this one lone sentinel, obelisk left. As far as the article indicates there are no records.  The chapel that was there did burn down but the article states that a transfer of the church and cemetery to Portage Du Fort occurred, and Hwy 303 was built bypassing the area.

These are the grandparents of Janet, who married Ronald son of Alexander John McDonell and Ellen McPherson.  This is the Lundie McDonald connection.

The east side reads of the tall stone reads:

Alex McDonell died Jan. 1, 1842 AE 88 Yrs

his wife Janet died Jan. 14, 1847 AE 84 yrs.

The south side reads:

Their Son Ranald drowned July 18, 1854 AE 68 yrs. 

This article reads:

In 1840 Alexander McDonell donated an eight acre plot of land for a Roman Catholic Chapel and cemetery to be built, the nearest at that time being at Calumet Island.”

The mission of Ste-Melanie continued to be served by the incumbents of Calumet until 1854 when Father Bouvier completed the construction of the stone church…at Portage Du Fort and opened a new cemetery. The log chapel and cemetery at Clarendon were abandoned…The chapel is said to have burned down…”

“When the chapel (finally) was built, it was alongside the road which ran from Aylmer to Portage Du Fort. That road was abandoned in favour of the present Highwy 303 which runs between Portage du Fort and Shawville, nearly a mile to the north of the chapel site, thus making the cemetery a long distance from any public road, out of sight from passerby and inaccessible on private land with the permission of the owners.

Another comment made in the article is the name was changed because of another St. Alexandre cemetery at Sandpoint?

I followed out one of the sources listed:

Lone Sentinel of the Past” by S. Wyman MacKechnie from Ottawa Branch News, Volume XIII, Numbr 1, January-February 1980.”

It is of course the magazine of the Ottawa Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society.  Family History Library had copies and I found the article in a very tightly bounded volume, FHL Book 971-384 D25o V. 13, No. 1, Jan/Feb 1980.  This is a reprint from the Shawville Equity, September 28, 1977 with minor changes by the author.

I found it interesting that in this version the Ottawa Branch News, it was a brother-in-law of Alexander’s that pooled his land with Alexander for the purpose of the chapel and cemetery, not just Alexander donating land as the 3 page manuscript suggests.  This individual received the land from his services in the Battle of Waterloo.  I would like to see the Shawville Equity Article just to see what was really written.

In 2012, when I was touring the Upper Ottawa area and driving from Renfrew city to Portage Du Fort to Shawville, I went right by there on Hwy 303 several times and could have sought out this tombstone. I was trying to identify cemeteries with McD’s in them in the area and I was all over the internet and cemetery books but this one I missed.  I have realized since I came home and did my 2nd tour of Canada that I did not extend my searches wide enough but then I didn’t have a lot of time.

Here are the other sources in the article and I have not been able to find online versions probably due to copyright:

Highways of Destiny, A History of the Diocese of Pembroke, Ottawa Valley Canada, by Rev. Wm. C. O’Dwyer, 1964.

Clarendon and Shawville, by J. Lloyd Armstrong, Dickson Enterprises, Shawville, 1980.

Lift Up Your Hearts, A History of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Pembroke, by Rev. Joseph C. Legree, 1988.

If anyone knows this cemetery, has photos and is willing to share, please contact me and leave a comment


John Mor MacDonell husband to Flora McLellan…

November 13, 2014

In past post I have shared about Ronald and his wife Janet’s story.  She is the daughter of John Mor MacDonell and Flora McLlellan and he is the son of Alexander John MacDonell and Ellen McPherson. This makes Ronald (Ranald) a great great uncle.

Here are the posts I wrote:

  • Revisiting: Ronald (Ranald) and Janet McDonell – The Lundie Family Connection!, August 26, 2014
  • The Ronald McDonell & Janet McDonell Family, September 29, 2011

Mr. Perrault who commented on my the Revisiting post told me that there was a burial for John McDonald at St. Alphonsus.  He was correct, I was so busy getting ready for my trip to Ontario and Quebec that I had tucked away the record on my computer. His comments reminded me of this and so I share it with you.  I found it the other day.  So here is a transcription of the St. Alphonsus Church record.

Burial of John McDonnell

Burial of John McDonnell

John Mor MacDonell and his 2nd wife Flora McLellan

S3 John McDonell, St. Alphonse, Allumette Island, 13 February 1861.  I the undersigned priest of this mission have interred in the cemetery of this mission the body of John McDonell aged sixty-three years died 7th inst. Husband of Flora McLellan present Samuel McDonell, and James McDonell who have not signed.  Jas C. Lynch, Priest.

You can find a shortened version of the burial information:

#1324 McDonell, John 06 Feb 1861 buried 13 Feb. 1861 63 y. h/o Flora McLellon, 89

Source:  St. Alphonsus of Liquori, Chapeau, Allumette Island, Pontiac County, Quebec. Cemetery Inscriptions and Burial Records, by Elaine Brown.

I visited the St. Alphonsus Cemetery (old) in 2012 and stopped by several times but I did not find a tombstone for either John nor Flora but then I was not looking for this couple. There were a lot of missing stones, broken stones and more.

http://macdonellfamily.wordpress.com/2012/05/28/touring-the-upper-ottawa-river-st-alphonsus-of-liguori/

In the 1871 Canadian Census, I found a Flora McDonell living in Chichester, Pontiac Co., Quebec with a Allan and James McDonell ages 34 and 33. She was 62 years old which means she would have been born in 1809. If she is the correct Flora she was 18 years old when she married John in 1827, this date may be in the Perth Marriages, but I have not check them as this time.  She was born in Scotland and is Roman Catholic.  I have not been able to find a Flora in other census at this time.


The Alexander & Ellen Lineage vs. the Angus and Janet Lineage

November 6, 2014

When I started researching my father’s MacDonald surname, I had quite a bit of material to use to get started.  I had two family trees done by my Great Aunt Nellie, sister to my grandfather Ronald (R.S.).  The charts were dated 1932. I had the genealogical notes done by my Aunt Miriam a sister to my father.  I had pedigree charts and my own knowledge of my family.

I started at the beginning and began building and researching my family studying the life of my grandfather Ronald, his marriage to Grace, his siblings and their lives and also the lives of his parents Archibald and Mary McDonell. I was able to build a family history back to Archie and Mary to their marriage in 1861 and the Canadian census of 1861.  I have presented my findings in this blog about the lives my great grandparents Archie and Mary McDonell.

Using Nellie’s charts I was able to find many of the people on Mary’s side of the chart.  I used the census and the St. Alphonsus Catholic Church records in Chapeau.  All of the records pointed to Alexander John MacDonell and Ellen McPherson as the parents of the individuals I have featured on this blog in past posts.  Archie’s side of the family has only revealed one brother, a John McDonell who was living in Sheenboro.  There is a chart of his side of the family done by Nellie.

Mr. Duncan Darby MacDonald’s charts on pages 721 to 735 and specifically the one on page 73A, Chart 13 Sheet 5 – The Kennedy Connection, from his book PART IV is different than Aunt Nellie’s chart. Here is the detail of that book.

A collection of genealogical charts  Part-IV, 3rd Edition, ISBN O-921133-39-1.  Much of the earlier work done by Daniel F. McDonald of Bristol, Conn and other members of his family at Bridgend (Stone Villa) Lancaster.  A second edition was published in 1988 and the 3rd in 1993.  FHL#971.37 D2, book only.  

Here is a copy of my Aunt Nellie’s chart, which I have featured in a past post, just click on the photo below and it will open. There is a series of these posts in which I discuss both sides of the family and my findings.  You can find the posts by search for Nellie’s Charts.  This is the specific post I will be discuss in here, Post dated July 21, 2011 Nellie’s Charts – Her Mother Mary McDonell’s Family!

Alex. Ban McDonell Family Chart

Alex. Ban McDonell Family Chart

Now I cannot republish Mr. MacDonald’s chart here so I will have to recreate it.  He has for Mary, Rachel and Margaret the parents as Angus and Janet McDonell. There is also a brother named Angus.  It is this man who he indicates married Janet Catherine MacDonell.  After his death, she remarried to Thomas Payne.

See this post dated October 20, 2011 – Jennette Catherine McDonell and Her Two Marriages.

Angus & Janet MacDonell

Angus & Janet MacDonell Family per Duncan D. MacDonald Chart 13, Sheet 5 Part IV

You can see my two great grandparents are the pink boxes on the right.  This means, according to Duncan D. MacDonald, that Mary was not a sister to Jennette.  It also means that she is not a sister to Ronald who married Janet, a daughter of John Mor MacDonell and Flora McLellan members of the Lundie MacDonell family.

See my post dated August 26, 2014 “Revisiting: The Ronald (Ranald) and Janet McDonell – The Lundie Family Connection!”

Here is an expanded version showing some descendants.  On the left in the 2nd row Angus, a son, married to Jennette Catherine MacDonell. On the right are my great grandparents Mary and Archibald. Unfortunately, Duncan D. MacDonald does not give any lineage for Archibald.  He does for Alexander John MacDonell and has his wife Ellen McPherson with no lineage.

Duncan MacDonald's version of the Angus & Janet Tree

Duncan MacDonald’s version of the Angus & Janet Tree

Mr. MacDonald would have the following children for Alexander John MacDonell and Ellen McPherson, just click and it will open. Remember to hit your back button to return.

Alex and Ellen as per Duncan's Chart

Alex and Ellen as per Duncan’s Chart

So what is the real story? Who is my great-grandmother Mary McDonell a daughter of?  She is a daughter of Alexander John and Ellen McPherson per her marriage record to Archibald McDonell, from the St. Alphonsus Catholic Church in Chapeau, Pontiac Co., Quebec.

A. McDonell & M. McDonell Marriage

A. McDonell & M. McDonell Marriage

It reads as follows: .

 #M51, #1029798, The marriage of Archibald and Mary McDonell on April 9, 1861 at the St. Alphonse Church.

“St. Alphonse Allumette Island 9 April 1861 after the banns of marriage have beene once published at the prone (?) for mass in this mission between Archibald McDonell of this mission son of age of John McDonell and of Sara McDonell on the one part and Mary McDonell of this mission daughter of age of Alexander John McDonell and Ellen McPherson on the other part – a dispensation of two of the banns of marriage have been granted by us in virtue of a power accorded to us by his Lordship the Right Revd Doctor _______Bishop of Bytown and wherein no impediment have been discovered we the undersigned Priest of this mission have received their mutual consent to marriage and have giving them the mutual benediction at Saint Alphonse Allumette Island on this date aforesaids and on the presence of John McDonell and Rachael McDonell who have not signed.” [____ Lynch,] Priest.

In the 1861 Canadian Census it reads for line 37, pg 2, Allumette Twp., FHL Film #0517406, Dist. 415 through 430E,

Line 36 Allumette Twp. Rachel McDonell, born LC, Catholic, age 23, female. Line 37 Alex Jno McDonell, Farmer, born U.C., Catholic, age 66 male; line 38 Mary McDonell born U.C., Catholic, age 25, female; Line 39, Duncan McDonald, Laborer, born L.C., Catholic, age 19, male; Line 40, Finlay McDonell born L.C., Catholic, age 16, male.

So here we have a Alex Jno McDonell with Rachel, Mary, Duncan and Finlay.  This census does not show a relationship but they are grouped so we can assume some sort of connection.

Rachel died on 8 January 1881.  She is listed in the 1876 to 1886 Register of the St. Alphonse book. She is S1, Her entry reads:

S1 Rachel McDonell, St. Alphonse All. Island, 11 Aug 1881 We the undersigned [    ] have interred the body of Rachel McDonell died 8th Inst. parents were Alexander John McDonell and Ellen McPherson, aged 40 years. Present Angus McDonell and Alexander McDonell who have not signed.  Ja. C. Lynch, Priest. 

Based on these documents, I do not think that Mary or Rachel are the daughters of Angus and Janet.  They are the daughters of Alexander John McDonell and Ellen McPherson as my Aunt Nellie has indicated in her chart.  Other names on the chart all follow the lineage to Alexander John and Ellen.

What about Margaret, well she is a daughter of Angus and Janet. Again in the St. Alphonse church records 1859 to 1876 there is an entry for a death:

Margaret McDonnell, #S52, St. Alphonse Allumette Island, Dec, 23, 1862. We the undersigned priest of this mission have interred in the cemetery of this mission the body of Margaret died yesterday, aged 20 years daughter of Angus McDonell and Genet McDonell.  Present John Connoly & Donald McDonell who have not signed.  J.A. Lynch, Priest. 

I looks like Angus and Margaret were siblings and children of Angus and Janet/Genet.

From the book by Elaine Brown on the St. Alphonse Church there is these entries we see that Angus J. McDonald died in 1866 and the children above are not listed with an Angus, but with Alexander Jno. McDonell.

#A76, Row 3, pg. 4 Cemetery Inscriptions: Payne McDonald, 1) Janet C./McDonald/wife of/Thomas/Payne/died Sep 2, 1916/aged 84 y’rs/rest in peace/PAYNE; 2) Angus J/McDonald/died/July 15, 1866/aged 37 y”rs/rest in peace/

In my post dated March 23, 2010 The Records of the St. Alphonse Church. When I did the research on my family these records were not yet online at Ancestry.com and Family Search and even though the search engine is there it would not give me Angus and Jeanette’s marriage, I had to do it the hard way scrolling through the pages on Ancestry.  I knew the film number and the date so that helped.  Here is their marriage.

Baptisms, Marrriages & Burial Registers of the St. Alphonsus Catholic Church FHL#1029797, 1846-1858 with an additional index 1846-1876,  #M10, FHL#1029797. 

St. Liguoris, Allumette Island, September 26, 1851 after the banns of marriage have been twice published at the [       ] in this mission between Angus J. McDonell of this mission, son of age of Angus McDonell and Janet McDonell on the one part and Jennette McDonell daughter of age of  [  ] John McDonell and Ellen McPherson on the other part. A dispensation of the banns of marriage have been given by us in [     ] of a power accorded to us by his lordship the Right Rev. Doctor Guigues Bishop of Bytown and whereas no impediment having been discovered we the undersigned priest of this mission have received their mutual consent to the marriage and given the nuptial benediction at Liguori Allumette Island on the day of the date above mentioned and in the presence of Thomas McDonell, William McDonell and Catherine McDonell who have not signed.  Jas. Lynch, Priest. 

Unfortunately, Mr. Duncan D. MacDonald does not give sources and if he does only in some places on his charts. I am glad that I have found this information and can now study it and do more digging into the records.

I think I will continue to believe that my Great Aunt Nellie’s chart is correct.

 


New York Wanderings: Montreal to Plattsburgh, NY

October 5, 2014

Unfortunately I was hyper-ventilating about getting out of Montreal so my time at the BAnQ in Montreal was short.  However, now that I have visited Montreal, seen the Grand Bibliotheque and the Archives of Quebec, I am feeling a whole lot more confident.  I don’t know if I have figured out how to do Quebec genealogical research but I am getting smarter. HA!

It was time to move on and head for New York state and the USA.  Early in the morning I had loaded as much of my luggage into the car parked in the garage down the street as I could.  So I had only my computer case to worry about and as usual I stuff my pockets.  I went back to the Hotel St. Denis to check out.

The area in front of the Hotel St. Denis was filled with construction workers in the morning and by the time I had returned they had cut a hole in the sidewalk right in front of the hotel and taken up the parking space out front. The hotel staff were not happy they didn’t know about this till it happened.  The receptionist was very kind and we figured out that I could mail back the garage card to them rather than have to try to negotiate the mess out in front of the hotel.  She prepared an envelope and put some stamps on it.  I mailed it at my next stop.  I hope they got it safely?

My business done, I headed to my rental car and proceeded to get all my maps and stuff ready for getting me out of Montreal.  I was going over the Champlain Bridge.  See the photo below, yup the very one I drove over.

Champlain Bridge, from Montreal Insites http://www.memorablemontreal.com/accessibleQA/en/bridges/?id=163&menu=histoire

Yes I did this bridge…Champlain Bridge, from Montreal Insites http://www.memorablemontreal.com/accessibleQA/en/bridges/?id=163&menu=histoire

I took Rue Rene-Leverseque to Atwater and then turned left.  I continued on Atwater till it went under an underpass and just on the other side was the turn off to Hwy 20/15.  So far so good.

As I entered the Hwy 20/15 to get on the Champlain Bridge I discovered I had a big semi right behind me and he was not nice, he rode my bumper almost the whole of the bridge.  This bridge is very long and it crosses the St. Lawrence River.  Just on the other side I turned off to get on Hwy 15 to go south to the NY border, and fortunately, the signs said just that and I was able to follow easily.

Hwy 15 south to the USA border follows the St. Lawrence for a while and then it is inland and pretty straight with exits that are very far apart.  The signage is not very helpful for food and other needs. It is about 45 minutes to the border but before I arrived there, I stopped at a huge Souvenir shop and bought myself another T-Shirt which had Canada on it and then smaller letters for Montreal.  It is one of those that is very long so it is almost a dress but it was not expensive so it was a good thing.

The border came up very quickly and I was ready.  This time I had a nice young man who asked me just a few questions and then wanted to know more about my genealogy quest.  So we chatted a little and then I had to move on. I think he was bored. I had read this was a very busy border crossing and I had been prepared to wait but I was through it in not time.  There was a lot of construction in the area and the route back onto the highway was a little obscured with cones and things but I managed to find it.  I was now on I-87 going south.

I was home, back in the USA.  I really like Canada it is a beautiful country – Ontario and Quebec – but there is something about the USA…

There was a McDonald’s at the next exit and I decided to stop and take a break.  Plattsburgh was not that far and I was not in any hurry.  It was about 12 noon and so I had plenty of time.

It was nice to hear English and use dollars and I reflected that in Montreal they don’t smile.  I have to mention however that at the cafe down the street while eating my scone and having coffee one morning in Montreal the proprietor burst into song and all of us were smiling.  However, other than that, I did not see any smiling faces or hear laughter in Montreal. The conversations at the restaurants were very serious but animated in French. The hotel staff was friendly and I liked hearing “Bonjour Madame,” or “Pardon Madame” or just a simple “Bonjour.”

A Cafe on St. Denis, one of many

A Cafe on St. Denis, one of many

Finding the Econo Lodge in Plattsburg was not to difficult and I was soon in my room.  They had the Keurig Single Coffee maker but if I wanted coffee I was to buy it in the lobby.  What? Don’t worry I was prepared.

I wanted to see Lake Champlain so I had sought out the Naked Turtle Restaurant as a place to go for dinner but when I got there it was gone!  So I took my pics of the lake and marina and went in search of the Applebees that I had noted earlier.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Champlain

I saw signs for ferry boats to Vermont on the highway I-81.  Here is some info about the city of Plattsburgh:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plattsburgh_(city),_New_York

Lake Champlain Marina

Lake Champlain Marina

Again, Lake Champlain Marina

Again, Lake Champlain Marina

Lake Champlain itself, a portion of this huge lake

Lake Champlain itself, a portion of this huge lake

Well, it was not that hard to go back and forth across the border even with a rental car so in retrospect I could have done my trip a bit different. Living 2.5 hours from the border in Seattle I just don’t go back and forth and when I do we usually have trouble getting from Canada back into the US. So I was concerned.  I have had the car/van inspected and other things happen.  I have to admit that it went a whole lot better going in and out of Ontario and Quebec than I thought.  Rental Car companies do not want you to leave the car in another country so I was obligated to bring it back to New York State.  Make sure that they will allow you to take the car into Canada before you rent.  Budget in Buffalo at the airport assured me they were bonded to do just that and go into Canada.  I did have the rental agreement with me so if I was asked I could hand it to the border guard.


Quebec Wanderings: A last look at Montreal…

October 4, 2014

Here are some of my photos that I took of Montreal.  It is in the form of a slideshow…enjoy! Just click on the first photo. The X to close may be on your left on the page.

There is a park in Montreal called Mont Royal and from there you can view the whole city and look out on Montreal.  I had considered going up there to enjoy the view.  http://www.montreal.com/parks/mtroyal.html  Just use Google Images to see wonderful pictures of the view from this park.

 


Quebec Wanderings: Montreal and the BAnQ…

October 4, 2014

It was fun to watch the day turn to night and the morning dawn in Montreal even though my window was a bit small in my hotel room.

Morning comes to Montreal

Morning comes to Montreal or was this night-time? Giggle!

Today I was going over to Viger Street to explore the BAnQ or if you prefer the Bibliotheque et Archives Nationales Du Quebec.  (I don’t do the accents).

I headed down St. Denis (south-east) and stopped at one of the cafes to buy a sandwich.  I crossed Avenue Rene-Levesque and had to decide which direction to go because they had Rue St. Denis barricaded from this point on. So I turned left (northeast) and headed to Rue Berri which was also barricaded, with one lane left for cars, but I was able to get across it to the other side and I turned right (southeast) and headed down that street to Viger Street.

I was expecting the BAnQ to be on the right side of Viger (south-east) but it was not.  It was on the left side (northeast) and as I was walking I noticed this building seemed very familiar.  It is actually on the corner of Rue Labelle and Avenue Viger.  http://www.banq.qc.ca/accueil/#

The Archives of Quebec - BAnQ

The Archives of Quebec – BAnQ

 

Looking toward the river

Looking toward the river across the street – Place Viger?

I was very early so I sat on the side area up the steps and waited and was just getting comfortable when a lady came up the steps and went inside.  It was cool outside and maybe about to sprinkle so I followed her through the door and it opened up into a large foyer.  I spotted the security guard on the left and walked over to him.  He had me sign in, took my $2.00 coin and gave me a locker key.  He gave me directions to the locker room which was around the corner through the two big doors.  He told me I could wear my jacket but not take my computer bag inside.

The entrance sign

The entrance sign

Archives of Quebec

Archives of Quebec

It took me a while to find my locker and it was very generous in size, not all are.  I prepared myself for my time at this archive and in the locker room area there is a little kitchenette with tables, machines with food and bathrooms.  I headed out to the stairs which were silver metal (yes you make noise when you walk on them) and walked up them to the next level which was filled with tables. It was very wide open with a high ceiling. I turned up some more metal stairs to the lobby area where there were these enormous statues guarding the lovely door to the archives.

Entrance - Archives of Quebec

Entrance – Archives of Quebec

Greeted by one of several statues

Greeted by one of several huge statues…made me think of Rome…

They had nice comfy chairs to sit in while the researches gathered at the door waiting for it to open at 9 am.  One man was standing with his laptop in tucked under his arm and he was apparently impatiently waiting.  Most of the researchers talked quietly in French.

They have done extensive remodeling so the interior is very modern yet you feel comfortable.

Once the door was open the other researchers disappeared quickly…probably to upper floors.  I turned right into the main room.  I found a table and proceeded to explore the area and the stacks.  It was where the genealogy stacks were housed and they had various Drouin collections, church records and more.  It was beautiful in this room for they had retained the old style of it.  It had a high ceiling and you could see the upper levels.  Their was lovely scroll work and columns.  It was all in white.

The librarian was very kind and friendly. He spoke good English.  He answered my questions readily. I told him about my bad experience at the Gatineau branch and he explained that they had the original records but most was on microfilm. So I could do notarial research there at this main branch. I was very happy to hear this.

He would have to prepare a researcher card for me because the microfilm was housed elsewhere in the building.  I was not going to be there that long so I declined.

I then asked him about land records and he referred me to the Registre foncier website. We chatted about this site and that I could sign up to obtain land records.  I knew about this site. I had been to the Palais de Justice in Campbell’s Bay for Pontiac County and she only was able to go back to late 1800′s on the land records.  He mentioned that there had been fires and other things which I cannot remember now.  This is the site:  http://www.registrefoncier.gouv.qc.ca/Sirf/

We talked about notaries and he said the online version is still being added too.  I showed him my copies of the list of notaries and he said that it was a good thing I had that because it was from the book that lists all the notaries throughout Quebec.  I was on the right track.  Quebec does things by French law and a notary is like a lawyer and they do all the legal things like deeds, mortgages, estates, wills, and even marriages and a whole lot more. Anyway, they are organized by notary name and years not by the subject or instrument.  Some day they may be to this point of being able to research by keyword.  So you have to know the name of the notary and where he was located and his time frame.

Online at the BAnQ:  http://bibnum2.banq.qc.ca/bna/notaires/index.html

Source that I had copies from:

Notaries listed

Notaries listed

I was starting to feel a whole lot better about my Quebec research.  He said that he was there during the week and if I had questions I could call.  They only speak French in Gatineau at least the man behind the counter but I figured he could read it and he did.

Unfortunately, my time was short and I had to head back to the Hotel St. Denis to check out by 12 noon.  I think I just might have to come back to Montreal and now that I know a little more about this city, the archives there, I just might do that.  I wonder if I could stop there on my way to New Brunswick??? Giggle…

The security guard wanted to check all my stuff at the door before he would let me leave.  This was before the locker room.

The BAnQ takes up the whole block

The BAnQ takes up the whole block – along  Rue Labelle

 

The Back door?

The Back door?

 

Hotel Viger is across the street

The sign!

Hotel Viger

Hotel Viger right across the street!

http://www.hotel-viger.com/index.html?viewPage=pages/reservations.php

My time was very short but I was okay with that.  I had really just wanted to see these two archives and get a feel for what they were about.  I am a very visual person so this has helped greatly.  I also feel that I have plenty of research to do which I can do online so I am not too concerned; however, I am considering going back to Montreal.

This looks interesting, perhaps a tour of the harbour?

http://www.oldportofmontreal.com/heritage/history-of-the-old-port.html


Quebec Wanderings: Historic City Center – Old Montreal (Vieux-Montreal)

October 4, 2014

Old Montreal the historic center of the city is not far from my hotel and I could walk to the area. The weather had improved yet it was a little cool and windy.  I had found a website that gave presented a historic walking tour of the area so armed with my maps I headed out to Rene Levesque Street and then turned to head to the Ave L’Hotel de Ville.  As I was walking along I discovered that there were several other hotels not to far down the street.  I spotted a Days Inn, a Holiday Inn Express not to far from where I was on St. Denis.  I think it was the way they looked that intrigued me, because normally these hotels are more spread out.

Other hotels

Other hotels Days Inn, Holiday Inn….

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Holiday Inn Express on the left and another hotel on the right.

I walked along L’Hotel de Ville to a park and then a very large an old building with big wide stairs to climb and it opened out onto the Jacque Cartier Square.   I had lunch at the Restaurant des Gouverneurs  off to the right of the square.  It was a nice ravioli.

Here is a brochure in PDF of a walking tour of Old Montreal:

http://www.vieux.montreal.qc.ca/mus_attr/pdf/attr_09a.pdf

So you could plan out a really nice tour of the area. I ended up wandering around. http://www.vieux.montreal.qc.ca/tour/eng/0cartea.htm

Jacques Cartier Square

Jacques Cartier Square, he is on the top of the tall monument!

Jacques Cartier and more

Jacques Cartier and more

More of the square

More of the square

Statues of course

Statues of course

Old Montreal…enjoy!  To get inside some of the shops you had to climb up very steep stairs.  You know me and stairs, HA!

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The Musee Pointe-a-Calliere

The Musee Pointe-a-Calliere

http://www.pacmusee.qc.ca/en/home

Heading back to my hotel…

The church rang its bell

The church rang its bell..bong…

Notre Dame

Notre Dame – behind this was the parish office…hmmm…what treasures would be there!

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Wonderful cakes and a Christmas Shoppe!

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Below:  A wine shop where I bought a very nice Quebec Wine “Frontenac” 2012 by Vignoble de l’ Orpailleur:  http://orpailleur.ca/en/

Wine Shop in this hotel

Wine Shop in this hotel

Montreal's Palais de Justice

Montreal a Palais de Justice, seems I saw several?

Chinatown was about 1 block long:

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There is so much more to explore in Old Montreal, it could take a good week! Not to mention all the history in this area.  I wanted to know where the immigrants came in to the harbour but apparently they have replaced the area with a marina.  This link walks you through the history of Old Montreal:   http://www.vieux.montreal.qc.ca/tour/etape1/eng/1fena.htm

Here is a slide show for you to enjoy, just click on the first photo and it will open.  The close button may be in your left corner find the X:


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