Touring Glengarry: Kirkhill

June 29, 2012

So far I had visited the historical townships of  Charlottenburgh, Kenyon, Lancaster but not Lochiel.

According to the locals it is pronounced “Laheel.”  It is the best way I can present it to you.

Remember that Charlottenburgh and Lancaster are part of the The South Glengarry municipality and their website does have some history of the area.  http://www.southglengarry.com/  Click the link “Visitors.”  They also feature their communities.  Kenyon and Lochiel are part of the North Glengarry site: http://www.northglengarry.ca/en/

I headed up Hwy #34 passed the sign for St. Raphael’s and through Green Valley and Alexandria and kept going north till the road started to curve at McCrimmon to the right.  I was still following Hwy #34.  The highway started to curve left and I turned right onto Lochinvar Rd.  I came to the Old Military Road and went south to the Laggan-Glenelg Rd. or Hwy #24. Apparently this highway has a jog in it because it was the same one for Dunvegan.

A view of Lochiel

Off in the distance were two spires and two churches.  It was…WOW!  My heart started to pump.  I am so glad I decided to tour more of Glengarry.  This was worth it.  Absolutely lovely.

Can you see the spires?

When I was in Pembroke and at the Upper Ottawa Valley Genealogical Group library I found a family history in which the writer wrote about the Roman Catholic and the Presbyterian Scots.  He two columns of names listing the Presbyterian Scots on one side and the Roman Catholic on the other.  Then he had arrows pointing to intermarriages.  It really hit home to me that you do need to consider both of these religious groups when you do your genealogical research in Canada.  I learned that Rev. Bethune did marry and baptize children in the Roman Catholic faith for he was the only one in the area for a great while.

St. Columba Church and the modern world

St. Columba Catholic Presbyterian Church is on the south side of Hwy #24.  I turned off Old Military Road and headed west turning left into the parking area.

St. Columba’s welcome sign

The church and cemetery.

UPDATE:  Please note that I mispelled the name St. Columbia.  It should be St. Columba.

St. Columba and its cemetery

The cemetery surrounds the church from the left around the back to the right.  A wooden stand located in the front of the church holds a copy of the St. Columba Cemetery Register publication inside it protected from the elements.  It is there on the honor system so please leave it for others to use.

The book of the cemetery inside this!

Many of the stones say things like this one.

All Natives of Glenelg, Invernesshire, Scotland

UPDATE 7/9/2012:  Below is a link to more photographs taken on this trip to this cemetery.  They are emphasizing McD*’s in the various spellings of the surname.  Most are overview photographs to give a sense of the location.  UPDATE:  1/9/2013 – I fix the title of the Picasa web album removing the RC from it.

St. Columba Church & Cemetery

Across the highway and a little further east is the Kirkhill United Church.

The Kirkhill United Church

A closer look at this church.

Kirkhill United Church

An overview of the cemetery.  They also have a stand that holds a copy of the cemetery book.  Please use it and leave it there for others.

Kirkhill United Church cemetery

I have more photographs of each of these cemeteries and will upload them when I finish posting about this trip to Ontario and Quebec.

UPDATE 7/09/2012:  Below is a link to more photographs of this cemetery.  These are overview photographs and some stones emphasize the McD* surname.

Kirkhill United Church & Cemetery

St. Columba in the distance from the Kirkhill United Church.

St. Columbia in the distance


Touring Glengarry: Cornwall to South Lancaster

June 29, 2012

It was Thursday, June 7, 2012 and I had just three days left on my trip to Ontario and Quebec.  I had to be in Ottawa in the evening so I wanted to make the most of my tour from Cornwall to Glengarry to Ottawa.

As usual I was up early and had the car packed.  I gave the key to the owner and realized she had a nice pot of coffee in the lobby so I took advantage and poured myself a cup.  I said my goodbyes to her, a very nice lady, and started to explore the area where the Monte Carlo Motel is located.

The St. Lawrence River is right there across Hwy #2 and there isn’t much land between Hwy #2 and the river.  As I crossed over being careful to watch out for the morning commuters, I was surprised to find a dock area.  Apparently you can dock your boat at the Monte Carlo Motel and stay the night.

The St. Lawrence River across from the Monte Carlo Motel

Here is a website with history and interesting information about this great river:  http://www.vsr.cape.com/~powens/riverhistory.htm

An of course, Wikipedia has this to say and it does have pictures: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Lawrence_River

Cruising the St. Lawrence wouldn’t that be nice:  http://www.stlawrencerivercruise.com/index.cfm?page=cruise_ktq

I didn’t wish to disturb the man who was on the docks enjoying the sunny morning air and view.  I love mornings especially this kind of morning.  It was so peaceful and lovely.

A lone man on the dock

The St. Lawrence to the east.

The St. Lawrence to the east.

The St. Lawrence to the west sort of…

The St. Lawrence to the west, sort of

Just before I arrived at South Lancaster you will find the Cooper Marsh Conservation Area http://www.rrca.on.ca/view.php?id=52  Try using Google Images to take a look at some really great pictures of this area.  I would have loved to explore it with my sister a docent at the Woodland Park Zoo here in Seattle.

The park of the Cooper Marsh area

I had been by South Lancaster earlier in the week but this time I didn’t just follow Hwy #2 which curves up leading you into Lancaster and then east paralleling Hwy #401 MacDonald-Cartier Freeway, I stopped at the sign announcing South Lancaster and proceeded along the Old Montreal Rd.

The sign to South Lancaster

I turned south on Cairn View Rd. and came to the South Lancaster Wharf.

The Wharf in South Lancaster

The wharf juts out into Lake St. Francis.  http://www.cruiserswiki.org/wiki/Lake_st_francis

The Wharf is very long

There were two men walking their dogs and we visited briefly while I introduced myself to their companions a beautiful Collie and a cute little white dog.

South Lancaster’s Wharf

About this location near the wharf, Ms. Dumbrille writes  in her book Up and Down the Glens on page 8:

“It was in the midst of these hard times that two ships bearing a body of emigrants from Scotland set out for Upper Canada (or Canada West as it was now called). One of these, the Macdonald, it carried 560 passengers –the entire parish of Knoydart, in Glengarry — in charge of their priest, Father Alexander Macdonell.  Brought up the St. Lawrence from Quebec in military bateaux, they landed at a sport near Lancaster, and were piped ashore and welcomed by their kinsmen amid scenes of rejoicing.”

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~onglenga/ShipMcdonaldSettlers.pdf

Lake St. Francis, South Lancaster

So far I have not found a plaque or anything indicating where in the area of South Lancaster they actually landed.  The descriptions are vague as to the actual events.

I left the area of the wharf and proceeded along Water Street and on my left was a stone wall and fence surrounding a cemetery.  I believe this to be the Old Cemetery in South Lancaster on Waters Street.

The Old Cemetery, South Lancaster

On Church St. I found the church and graveyard. St. Andrews Presbyterian Church founded in 1787 by Rev. Bethune, this is not the original church:  http://pccweb.ca/standrews-southlancaster/

St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, South Lancaster

A little humor. (Click and the photo will get larger, use your back button to return to this blog.)

Notice the sign!

The cemetery next to the St. Andrews Church is surrounded by a white metal fence. I have more photos which I will upload when I finish posting for this trip.

The cemetery next to St. Andrews, South Lancaster

A memorial plaque 1787 to 1855 to 1987 :

In Honor of the Church

Update 7/8/2012:  Here is a link of all the photographs I took of these two cemeteries in South Lancaster which were a few blocks apart.  These are overview photographs to give an idea of the location of these cemeteries.

Old Burial Ground & St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church & Cemetery

My tummy was calling so I continued on my journey, saying Good Bye to the St. Lawrence River, for now.  I headed north up Hwy #2 across the big freeway #401 and over to the right was a very shiny new Travel Plaza that housed a Denny’s? It also had a store called “Flying F,”  which had just about anything in it that you might want.  Exit #814 on the north side of the freeway. I found my T-Shirts that had just “Canada” on them.  It was a good thing, I needed clean shirts.  They have a whole line of Shell gasoline pumps.  So I stopped had breakfast and filled up the Caliber.  The Denny’s has WiFi.  They also have showers in the other part of this complex.

The Flying J, Exit 814 of 401

I was now content.  I could continue on my tour of Glengarry.


Last Night in Cornwall, A turn of events and a lovely view!

June 28, 2012

It was time to make a decision.  Go to Montreal or do more exploring of Glengarry.  I was very tired and I really wanted to see as much of Glengarry as I could.  I had not been to the northeast part – Lochiel. 

So where was I going to stay this one night?  Well as I was driving back to Cornwall on Hwy #2 I came up to a motel right on the St. Lawrence River. 

The Monte Carlo Motel

It was the Monte Carlo Motel.  It is right there on Bryden Ave and Hwy#2.  I pulled in and the proprietor saw me and I was in luck.  She had a room for one night.  It is not a fancy motel but it is clean, tidy and the owner is very nice.  Most importantly it is right on the St. Lawrence. 

I unloaded my belongings and prepared to head out to Cornwall for this was the day that I was going to the Cornwall Room.  I posted about that before. 

So now I could tour more of Glengarry and head back to Ottawa in a more leisurely manner than I had planned. 

It meant I was not going to the Quebec Family History Society in Pointe-Claire and visiting the Archives Centre Montreal on 535 Viger Avenue East. http://www.banq.qc.ca/accueil/index.html 

I would have to figure something else out and be better prepared. 

Later on in the day I made my way past the Monte Carlo Motel along Hwy#2 to the Blue Anchor Lounge.  I had spotted it before and was curious.  It was a beautiful sunny day and the St. Lawrence was calling and so was my tummy.

I pulled into the parking lot on the side and saw the wonderful deck out back.  Perfect, absolutely perfect for sitting and having dinner, a glass of wine and enjoying the St. Lawrence.

I positioned myself under the eave of the deck and this is what I saw:

The view from my table at the Blue Anchor Lounge

Along came a big ship and it made good time.

A boat is coming!

Closer yet…

Closer yet and moving fast

A happy end to a busy day.


Touring Glengarry: Lancaster

June 28, 2012

While I write this post, I am munching on Lankaaster, aged Vieilli cheese and crackers.  I purchased it at the Glengarry Fine Cheese store north of Lancaster.  http://glengarryfinecheese.com/

Fine Cheese in Glengarry

These are the experiences that make a trip so worthwhile.  To enjoy the local products.  I would have purchased more but travel can make it difficult.  My little brick made it home and through security and to the USA.

The road in to and the sign – Lancaster

It is very flat around Lancaster. 

A Lancaster view

I was going in search of the Lancaster Library.  It is actually a branch of the S.D. & G. County Libraries. 

The Lancaster branch of the S.D.&G. County Libraries

The library is situated on the main street of Lancaster. The website gives a listing of the locations of the S.D.&G. Libraries with hours and more.   http://www.sdglibrary.ca/index.cfm?Title=Hours  

The main street in Lancaster

I just stumbled onto this today: 

 http://www.facebook.com/pages/SDG-County-Library/250998401616550 

There is a S.D.&G. Branch in Cornwall.  It is apparently the Administrative Offices and they are on Facebook. I also found that there are a lot of Video Tutorials on You Tube for this library system. 

My goal in this library was to see what it had in genealogical sources.  I entered the library and much to my surprise I saw Penny.  She is the person I met at the Glengarry Archives.  I was very happy to see her.  We chatted happily. 

The Local History section of this library is in a little room off to the left as you enter.  It is not a very big library but it was comfortable. 

This the section for genealogy at the Lancaster Library

 I finished up at the Lancaster Library and headed out.  here are some views of the area around Lancaster.  

One of many farms in the Glengarry area

Green and flat


Touring Glengarry: St. Andrews West (Stormont)

June 28, 2012

Hwy #18 heading west will eventually take you to St. Andrews West.  It is not in Glengarry but rather in Stormont.  I include it in Touring Glengarry because the people would move back and forth between St. Andrews Catholic Church and St. Raphael’s.  It is in the marriage records of the individuals in the Drouin Collection of Catholic records which is online at Ancestry and also Family History Library.

St. Andrew’s sign

When I first saw St. Andrews Catholic Church I was driving up Hwy #138 to Dunvegan and came up over this rise and there it was right before me.  WOW!  The following photograph is the closest I can get to what I saw that first time. 

Move over a little to the right and you are on the highway when you see this view

St. Andrews West is north of Cornwall on Hwy #138 when it intersects with Hwy #18.  The church is on the southwest corner of this intersection.

Behind Quinn’s and St. Andrews Catholic Church

Quinn’s Inn is on the northeast corner of this intersection.  I had dinner at Quinn’s.  There is parking in back.  You then walk through the doors in the back.  Quinn’s was busy the night I was there.  It is a restaurant but different.  It was a big room where the tables were but it was more like an old pub would have been like.  The hosts were a man and woman and they were the one’s serving us.  They were having a special on prime rib.  My dinner was $20.00.  http://www.quinnsinn.ca/

A little history of Quinn’s

There was a reason I was visiting Quinn’s.  It was because of John Sandfield MacDonald the first Premier of Ontario.  My grandfather was named Ronald Sandfield McDonald.  His brother Angus, named a son Lorne Sandfield McDonald.  Now, my dad’s sister Miriam said the name was given in honor by my great-grandfather Archibald McDonell.  She writes in her notes:

Name after John Sandfield MacDonald

I cannot ignore this use of the name Sandfield.  Even though Miriam thought it was to honor the Premier maybe there is a connection.  So far I have not figured it out.  I think I have to dig more into John Sandfield’s background.  His marriage and children are easy to find online but I believe I will have to go back further into this man’s family to see if there is a connection. 

There are two cemeteries.  The one on Hwy #138 is newer with an older section to the north.  There is a big field between it and the church. 

The newer cemetery on Hwy #138 St. Andrews West

The Old Burying Ground is right across from Quinn’s on the northwest corner.  Just watch as you cross for this intersection is very busy and there are many trucks taking Hwy #138 both north and south.

I was losing the light and it is almost impossible to get the whole church into a photograph the spire is so tall.

The Old Burying Ground and St. Andrews Church

In this Old Burying Ground is the tombstone of John Sandfield MacDonald.  If you look close enough at the photograph above you can find it and more.

John Sandfield MacDonald’s Tombstone

 Not to far from him is the tombstone of Simon Fraser, the man who went west and found the Fraser River, which I just recently saw on my trip to British Columbia.  I am somewhat fascinated with explorers and Simon Fraser has been one of them. 

Simon Fraser’s tombstone

 St. Andrews West water tower.

Almost in competition with the St. Andrews Church

I took many photographs of the two cemeteries and will upload them when I finish posting about this trip.  I am almost done.

UPDATE 7/9/2012:  Here are two links to additional photographs of the Old Burial Ground and the newer cemetery in St. Andrew’s West, Ontario.  I started in the southern part from the western side to the eastern (highway) of the larger cemetery south of the church and proceeded north to the older part of the cemetery by the field and then the church.  The Old Burial Ground is not photographed in any particular order and is not complete. 

 

St. Andrew’s West Cemetery & Church
Old Burial Ground, St. Andrews West

Touring Glengarry: Martintown

June 28, 2012

I was becoming very fond of Hwy #18.  I had traveled through Martintown once so I knew I had best return and do a little more investigating.

Welcoming Sign

The road curves through Martintown and revealed first St. Williams Catholic Church.  I tried to locate the cemetery but I was not finding it.

St. Williams Catholic Church

On Kirk St. and River Road I did find St. Andrews United Church and Cemetery.  This is Presbyterian.  The church was so shrouded by trees that I could not get a full good front view.

St. Andrews Church, Martintown

The cemetery surrounded the church on all sides:

St. Andrews Church the side view


Touring Glengarry: St. Raphael’s

June 28, 2012

“Oh ye tak the high road, and I’ll tak the low road, and I’ll be in Scotland afore ye, for me and my true love will never meet again on the bonnie bonnie banks of Loch Lomond.”  (Steven McDonald, CD “Sons of Somerled” and “Stone of Destiny”)  Mr. McDonald and are displaced Scots.

St. Raphael’s is surreal.  I walked the ruins and the cemetery and visited twice to make sure it will always be a part of my memory.   I approached the ruins from both directions.  My first visit was going west and all of a sudden you come out of the trees and there it is before you.  Following the road from the east you see what the photograph below shows you.

Facing east toward St. Raphael’s

The website for the ruins is filled with interesting information about the history of the site, photographs of the ruins being used for events, how to give or become a member, music and more.  Take a moment or two to study it before you look at my photographs. 

http://www.saintraphaelsruins.com/

My first visit I turned left off of Hwy #34 and headed west on Hwy #18.  The second visit was up Brookdale in Cornwall to Hwy #138 and turned right onto Hwy #18 at St. Andrews West.  Hwy #18 is very nice going east to west and you can go through St. Andrews West, drive through Martintown and come to St. Raphael’s and then to Hwy #34 which can take you north to south.  Along the way you can turn down Hwy #19 to Williamstown.  It is a beautiful drive to St. Raphael’s along Hwy #18.

When you first see St. Raphael’s, from the west, you are stunned by its stately manner. St. Raphael is on a ridge, at least that was my feeling.  There is a U-shaped driveway in front of the ruins so you can park easily. 

The front of St. Raphael’s rises so…

You cannot get it all in your photograph so you have to try various angles. 

From the eastern side – St. Raphael’s

I was so fortunate, both days I visited it was warm and sunny. 

From the side, it is so tall

This man in a truck parked and went into the interior of the ruins.  I waited till he had his turn before I entered.

Through one of the wrought iron gates.

Once he had finished his visit, I entered from the front.

Entering St. Raphael’s Ruins

I felt like I should whisper but instead I gently sang “Loch Lomond.” 

A very nice video of the song and lyrics is presented here:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rbb9aRSQpsY 

The other song was “Auld Lang Syne.”  Forgive me, but you must have some music when you visit.

Looking back to the front entrance, St. Raphael’s

To document my visit to St. Raphael’s I took a timed picture of me in the front of the church.

I really was there at St. Raphael’s

This is the functioning part of St. Raphael’s and the present part of the Parish of St. Raphael’s.

The church of today attached to the right side of the ruins as you face them

There are many plaques out in front one of which is commemorating the Glengarry Immigration:

The Glengarry Emigration of 1786

 A plaque in both English and French sharing information about Bishop Alexander Macdonell 1762-1840. It is on the brick pillar right in front of the church ruins.

About Bishop Macdonell 1762-1840

The plaque that features a brief history of the ruins.  There is a photograph of the church before the fire in the book:  Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry A History, by John G. Harkness on page 126 and a picture of the Bishop.

About the Ruins

This plaque is attached to the walls of the ruins and one is in French and the other in English: 

Attached to the wall of the ruins

The cemetery wraps around St. Raphael’s dominating the area behind the church. 

The cemetery behind the church ruins

The cemetery is also on the left side as you face the front of the church.  

Looking east toward the road and the cemetery

From the east looking west the cemetery spills down the hill much farther than I had expected or noticed on my first visit to the ruins. 

Looking west to the ruins and cemetery

 The welcoming sign of St. Raphael’s Parish and the cattle who were lowing as I visited.

The cattle were lowing during my visit

Remember to click on the photograph and it will open up in a bigger window.  Then click your back button to return to this blog.  I will upload more photos from my visit when I finish posting for this trip.

UPDATE 07/09/2012:  The link below includes additional photographs of the ruins and the area around it.  These are overview photographs.

 

St. Raphael’s Ruins & Cemetery

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 32 other followers

%d bloggers like this: