Kingston and the Cataraqui Cemetery – A Special Visit

June 22, 2012

Kingston’s Water Tower

Before I left Kingston, I had to make a visit and pay my respects.  Since I don’t know what McDonald family I am related in Ontario, I do have to make sure I acknowledge all McD’s in all is various spellings.

My goal was to visit Sir John A. MacDonald at the Cataraqui Cemetery in Kingston.  There are many websites that describe this man but I think I will send you here.  The Canadians call him Sir Johnny:  http://www.canadahistory.com/sections/politics/pm/johnmacdonald.htm

I entered the Cataraqui Cemetery from the side off of Sydenham Road.  I had a map of the cemetery from a newspaper handout I found at the OGS Conference - “Special Advertising Feature – Cataraqui Cemetery Celebrating 162 years as Kingston’s Historic Garden Cemetery.”  I passed Christ Church and followed the signs to his gravesite.  There is a sign on the opposite side of Oak Ave. pointing to the gravesite.  The map in the flyer had grave site as #9 and that helped.  It is a very large cemetery. 

Suggestion:  I came up Princess Street and went up Sydenham Road and entered the side of the cemetery.  I suggest you turn from Princess onto John Counter Blvd. then a quick left onto Purdy’s Ct. then right onto Purdy’s Mill Rd.  Then you enter from the front gate where the big stone Pillar’s are.  Follow Maple Ave and turn to the right onto East Ave and around to Oak Avenue.  The grave site is almost to West Ave.  Look for the sign below, remember I came from the opposite direction so it would be on your right if you come in the front gate.

The Entrance Sign to Cataraqui Cemetery, Kingston

This is the sign pointing to the opposite side of the road toward his grave.

Sign pointing to the grave Sir John A. Macdonald, Cataraqui Cemetery

This is what you see as you approach:

Looking toward the grave site area – Sir John A. Macdonald

Sir John Alexander Macdonald’s tombstone which is surrounded by a black wrought iron fence.  I did not see where I could open the gate to get closer.  I suppose for many people could eventually cause damage. 

Sir John A. Macdonald’s Tombstone

Sir John A. Macdonald and me!

I will add more photos later and provide a link to them showing more of his gravesite when I get my posting done for this trip.  I am almost there.  I have to admit that I am and was affected.  I am not Canadian by birth but my parents especially my mother’s side came from Canada and on my father’s are his father’s family. 

An Overview of Cataraqui Cemetery, Kingston

Earlier I had been in the downtown area of Kingston and had seen a historical plaque of another very well-known MacDonell.  The Bishop Alexander MacDonell 1762-1840.  Roman Catholic Bishop of the diocese of Kingston. The plaque was next to the house he lived in while in Kingston.  I did not stand back and take a photo for I was in a hurry to get to Anglican Diocese office for my appointment and still in my car.  This link below will explain the plaque better.

http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMEJVM_BISHOP_ALEXANDER_MACDONELL_1762_1840_Kingston

Plaque for Bishop Alexander MacDonell

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Macdonell_(bishop) I will be visiting other plaques and will come back to share more about this amazing man. 

The clock was ticking and it was time for me to head for Cornwall to the east.  I headed down the main street – Princess and through downtown Kingston.  

Princess Street, Kingston, Ontario

I crossed over the bridge taking Hwy 2 east.  The bridge is called the Lasalle Causeway Bridge and it crosses the Cataraqui River which is the southern part of the Rideau Canal:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Salle_Causeway 

I was soon driving through and under arches that were part of the Canadian Forces Base.  This was my first notice of anything military in Canada, although in Petawawa there is another Canadian Forces Base.  I did not venture from Pembroke up to Petawawa to investigate.   I think I saw Royal Canadian Airforce Signs.  My dad would have loved that, remember the title of this blog:  The Man Who Lived Airplanes.  Very impressive. 

My next milestone was the town of Garanoque where I would leave Hwy 2 for the 1000 Island Parkway.  It was time to become just a tourist.

UPDATE:  July 7, 2012:  Here is a link to more photos that I have taken of Cataraqui Cemetery in Kingston.

Cataraqui Cemetery

Kingston: Anglican Archive, Visit with a Friend & the OGS

June 21, 2012

Friday June 1, 2012 was going to be a very busy day. 

My first appointment was with the Anglican Diocese office in downtown Kingston.  This was regarding my Brown family research.  The Browns were Church of England and I was hoping to find out more about William Brown my 3rd great-grandfather.  I was in luck I did find his death and burial information.  See the blog: The Boardmans and Browns of Winnipeg. for more information about this trip.  http://boardmanbrown.wordpress.com/

Anglican Diocese Building, Kingston

After I finished up at the Diocese office I headed back to my B&B and waited impatiently for Elaine to arrive. 

Years ago I was reading an online mailing list for the Upper Ottawa Valley and this person by the name of Elaine Brown was sharing information about the various churches and church registers for the area.  I learned that she had compiled a book covering the deaths and burials at the cemetery in Chapeau for the St. Alphonsus Church.  I emailed her and bought a copy.  It was with me on this trip.  We have since shared information and information on McDonalds and Burns families in the area.  My great uncle John (Jack) McDonell married Sarah Burns and she was curious about there marriage.  I visited their daughter on several occasions in International Falls and put Elaine in touch with her.  Sadly Mary died several years ago about two months before I made my third trip to Minnesota. 

Elaine’s family history website:  http://www.personainternet.com/etbrown/burns.htm 

Elaine’s book:  http://www.personainternet.com/etbrown/alphonse.htm

Aunt Lucy’s in Kingston & Rain

Elaine and I were going to have lunch together and meet for the first time face-to-face.  The Briar Patch was no longer offering lunch so she took me to Aunt Lucy’s.  We were together from 12:30 to 4:30 pm or so.  It was a rainy day in Kingston (just like home) but we didn’t care for we were busy talking and sharing and having a great time.  I had so much fun I had dessert.  Elaine really knows a lot about genealogy in Canada and so I am very grateful to her for sharing and caring about a stranger from that country to the south.  HA!  Thanks for lunch Elaine, my treat next time. 

St. Lawrence College – Location of the OGS Conference 2012

The Ontario Genealogical Society (OGS) Conference started at 5 pm with a barbecue and so I parted with Elaine but was feeling very happy and content. 

The rain had moved the dinner inside so we were all gathering in the cafeteria of the St. Lawrence College for the OGS Conference “Borders and Bridges 2012,”  Several ladies came and sat at my table and we chatted about the conference, our research and where we were from.  As usual people are all surprised when they realize that I am from the other Washington located on the western side of the continent. http://www.ogs.on.ca/conference2012/

Registration was open so I stopped by to get my bag of goodies and a USB drive of the syllabus:

Registration OGS 2012

The opening ceremonies were done with pomp.  They had a fully costumed town crier which I understand is an award wining town crier.

The Opening of the Borders and Bridges, OGS Conference 2012

The next day the conference was in full swing starting about 8 am with the opening address.  I didn’t get there till later and cruised the vendors.  I was happy to see the Quebec Family History Society, Lambton County Genealogical Society and more.  I was very strong and didn’t buy too many books.  I had a nice chat with Coleen Fitzpatrick the author of the Forensic Genealogy.  She was telling me about autosonal testing for women opening up more possibilities.  I have been really considering DNA testing. I have a family member whom I would like to test but so far there is resistance.  I purchased her book:  DNA & Genealogy.  http://www.forensicgenealogy.info/

Vendors about to open Saturday June 2, 2012 OGS Conference

The lectures started about 11 am.  I attended several lectures about newspaper research and each lecture gave me more information about sources I had not tried.  John D. Reid gave “Your Family History in Canadian and British Newspapers. He was explaining the OCR and why it was not yet to a place where it could read all the letters efficiently.  He explained that some websites had better OCR technology than others.  He said to take your time and try different searched.   Meldon J. Wolfgang III gave “Extra! Hear All About it! Exploring Some New and Less Familiar Pathways in Newspaper Research.  He had some really interesting sources to use.  He is the man in the picture below.  Evelyn Kolish also gave an excellent lecture:  “Court Records Across the Border: How to Find Your Way Among Quebec’s Court Records.”  Slowly I am gaining confidence with researching in Quebec. 

Lecture on Newspaper sources

Everyone was wondering where the banquet would be held.  Well it was in the cafeteria and it was sort of amazing to see how they transferred it into a festive affair.  We were told that over 500 people were in attendance.  The banquet room was filled to capacity.  Susan de Groot of the Ontario Chapter of the Association for Professional Genealogists was attending the conference.  Susan and I have met several times at various conferences and she remembered me.  She kindly invited me to her table.  She is the owner of Windmill Genealogy Services.

Those seated at the table were John Reid of the British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa was present.  He gave the one of the lectures on newspaper research that I mention above.  Lisa Louise Cooke of Genealogy Gems sat with us.  She had been busy with lectures all day. Lisa had come all the way from California to attend the conference.  David Obee was present.  I have one of his books that he co-wrote with Sherry Irvine on Canadian Research.  The conversation was lively and interesting. 

Oh, yes they toasted the Queen and I found that very sweet. 

Banquet settings

The lectures started early Sunday morning, June 3, 2012 with the one I was looking forward to.  It was on Quebec land records titled “Digging up Genealogy Gems:  Quebec Land Records,” by Sharon Callaghan who I believe is also active in the Quebec Family History Society in La Pointe, Quebec:  http://www.qfhs.ca/  Her lecture was excellent and I was pleased. 

I decided to take another turn about the vendors and see what other things I could discover.  It actually took me a good hour and half to review them.  So it was almost time for lunch and since I had a ticket I decided to wait and get my sandwich.  When they set out the sandwiches I decided to stay and eat my lunch and again had a lovely conversation with several conference goers who sat down at my table.  I had my Nook Color reader with me, so I gave them an overview. 

Lectures would continue and then they would have a closing address later on in the day but I had to move on.  It was time to head to Cornwall and visit the Glengarry area.


Arriving in Kingston, Ontario

June 20, 2012

It was about 6 pm when I rolled into Kingston on Thursday, May 31, 2012.  I was there to attend the Ontario Genealogical Society Conference:  Borders and Bridge 1812-2012.  It was being held at the St. Lawrence College campus.

I had been touring in Hastings County to the west, visiting Mamora, Stirling, Trenton and Belleville and learning about their libraries and archives for research.  This was regarding my Brown family origins on my mother’s side.  I was not yet done because I wanted to visit the Anglican Diocese in Kingston for the Brown research.  I have described that experience and visit in my other blog: 

The Boardmans and Browns of Winnipeg:  http://boardmanbrown.wordpress.com/

My lodging was in a bed and breakfast called the Briar Patch.  Finding it was a little bit of trouble.  I left Belleville taking Hwy 2 to Tyendinaga, Napanese, Odessa, Westbrook and into Kingston itself. I was a little disappointed because I had hoped to see more of the Bay of Quinte on Hwy 2.  I guess you need to know where to go to see it?

I turned right and headed down Gardiner’s Road (Hwy 6) passed shopping centers.  I came to Bath Rd (Hwy 33) and turned left.  Then I got into trouble.  Bath is a very busy road. 

Hello Kingston

When I am tired it can get interesting.  I pulled into another shopping center and studied my maps.  I found Portsmouth which was to the west of this shopping center I had taken a break in.  I got back onto Bath and headed west past Portsmouth and just as I went past I saw the three numbers for the Briar Patch and pulled in.  It was shrouded in trees.  It was on the north side of Bath St. and there were islands in the middle of the road so it was not an easy place to get to.  They had a nice parking lot so I had plenty of room to situate my Caliber. 

My room was like a suite.  I had a foyer, a full bathroom, a sitting area and the biggest bed I have ever seen.  It took a little bit of climbing to get into it.  Sigh, no desk.  It did have a washer and dryer. Yippee, clean clothes! It was decorated with care and all the artwork and crafts you expect in a B&B.  There was an old door with a big flower wreath across from the bed.  http://www.bbcanada.com/8965.html?showpage=1 

I was greeted by Mark first and the Mary Jo gave me the tour.  She also helped me to figure out where to get some dinner and I chose the Red Lobster down the road to the west.  They accepted credit cards which was good.  Some do not and I didn’t need complication. 

I settled in for the night.  The next day I was to get a full breakfast and great conversation.  This is why I like B&B’s.

The Briar Patch


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