Alexander John and Ellen McPherson McDonell a possible marriage!

June 17, 2014

There is a marriage of an Alexander McDonell to a Nellie McPherson in the records of the St. Andrews parish registers for a St. Raphael marriage?  These two people are my 2nd great grandfather provided I have the lineage correct.  I will address that issue in future posts.

There are certain things about this marriage that make me think it might be them:

1.  The use of the name “Nellie.”  My Aunt Nellie’s formal name is Ellen Elizabeth.

2.  The fact that Nellie’s mother is named Rachel.  If I have the ancestry correct great-grandmother Mary’s sister was named Rachel.

3.  The date of the marriage is about right for the children of Alexander and Ellen McPherson.

4.  The names are John, Duncan and McDonell and McPherson and Cameron.

Marriage of Alexander and Nellie

Marriage of Alexander and Nellie

“The ninth day of July one thousand eight hundred and twenty two Alexander McDonell son of John McDonell and of Mary Cameron of the Parish of St. Raphael, & Nelly McPherson daughter of the late John McPherson and of Rachael McDonell also the Parish of Saint Raphael, after two proclamations of banns and the dispensation of the third, and also the Dispensation of consanguinity in the fourth degree, no other dispensation being granted, and no other impediment being know, were joined in marriage by me the undersigned Priest and Vicar of the said St. Raphael in presence of Alexander McDonell and of Duncan McDonell and several other witnesses. Alexander McDonell Duncan McDonell.  Signed J. MacDonald Pr.”

Source:  1802 to 1835 St. Andrew’s West, Co. Stormont, Ontario, Registre photo. at la paroisee per P. Crossbie) 16 decembre 1960, page 308, Drouin Collection at Ancestry.

What does 4th degree of consanguinity mean?  Here are links that might help to explain it.  I am pondering it myself.

http://www.dads.state.tx.us/handbooks/appendix/29.htm

http://www.mec.mo.gov/webdocs/pdf/misc/relationshipchart.pdf

At this point I am not sure how to proceed but it probably means that I need to dig into probate/estate to prove my theory and find a family history and a lot more.


Sarah M. (Burns) McDonald passes!

October 25, 2012

Sarah’s Tombstone

Jack had died in December of 1949 and Sarah, his wife, followed just shy of two years.  They are both buried in the St. Thomas Cemetery in International Falls.  This cemetery is part of the Forest Lawn Cemetery and there is a link to it under Minnesota Links on the right side of this blog.  They have the burials online.

Jack and Sarah appear in the 1930 U.S. Census living in International Falls, Koochiching County,  Minnesota with their daughter Mary C. McDonald.  It was Mary who cared for both of them at the end of their lives.

John and Sarah McDonald 1930 Census

Sixth Street, line 6, 903, 247, 271, McDonald, John A. Head, 0, $3000., M, W, 60, M. 32, no, yes, Canada English, Father and Mother Canada-English, English, 00, 43, 1901, NA, yes, Janitor, Public School, 6×44, w, yes, no. McDonald, Sarah, wife – H, F, W, 56, M, 28, no, yes, Canada-English, Father Northern Ireland, Mother Irish Free State, English, 00, 43, 1901, NA, yes, none. McDonald, Mary C., daughter, F, W, 17, S, yes, yes, Minnesota, Parents Canada-English, 64, 43 0, yes, none.

Source:  John McDonald Family, 1930 U.S. Federal Census, International Falls, Koochiching Co., Minnesota, Third (Part of) Block No. 56  lines 1-5, Block no. 55 lines 6 to 50. RD#36-21, SD#2, Sht #13A (154), enumerated April 11, 1930, Carl. V. Linsten.

Ten years later they are still a family of three:

Sixth Street, Line 56, 903, 49, 0, 2500, no, McDonald, John A., Head, M, W, 71, M, no, 4, Canada-English, NA, same house, blank for parents, yes – - – -, 60, Janitor, Public High School, GW, 52, 1800, no. McDonald, Sarah, wife, F, W, 65, M, no, 5, Canada-English, NA same house, blank for parents, no, no, no, no. H, o , o, no. McDonald, Mary, daughter, F, W, 27, S, no, H-4, Minnesota, same house, blank for parents, yes – - -, Bookkeeper, County Treasurer’s office, GW, 52, 932, no.

Source:  John A. McDonald Family, 1940 U.S. Federal Census, International Falls, Koochiching Co., Minnesota, Ward #3, SD# 12, ED# 36-198, Sht# 2B, enumerated on April 4, 1940, Dorothy P. Barkovic.

Here is the Death certificate for Sarah.

Sarah’s Death Certificate

Sarah was a resident for 50 years in International Falls, MN, died at the Falls Memorial Hospital, lived at 903 6th St., died Oct 25, 1951, female, white, widowed, date of birth Feb 18, 1874, age 77 yrs., housekeeper, owns own home, born in Canada, citizen of the USA. Father George Burns, mother Katherine Burns, spouse John A. McDonald #4201. Did not serve in armed forces, no SS#, informant was the Memorial Hospital in International Falls. Died of congestive heart failure and coronary sclerosis, no autopsy. Burial on Oct 27, 1951 at St. Thomas Cemetery in International Falls, MN, filed Oct. 27, 1951. Handled by Green Mortuary, International Falls, MN.

Source:  Sarah McDonald, Certificate of Death #7429, Oct. 25, 1951, Minnesota Department of Health, Division of Vital Statistics, FHL#2139363. 

Appearing in The Daily Journal, International Falls, Friday, October 26, 1951 is an article about Sarah.

Sarah Burns McDonald “Mrs. McDonald”

Sarah McDonald, City Resident Since 1904, Dies. Mrs. Sarah MacDonald, a resident of International Falls since 1904, died late Thursday in Memorial hospital following a year of illness. She was 77. Death was attributed to heart ailment. The deceased was the widow of J.A. (Jack) McDonald, one-time mayor of the Falls. One daughter,  Mrs. Gilbert (Mary) Louiseau —-Sixth St. survives. Funeral services are set for 8 am Saturday in St. Thomas church with Fr. Edward Lamontagne officiating. Interment will be in St. Thomas cemetery. The Rosary will be recited at 8 pm today in the Green Mortuary chapel. Mrs. McDonald, the former Sarah Burns, was born Feb. 18, 1874 in eastern Canada and moved to the United States immediately following her marriage in 1901. The couple lived in Bemidji before moving to the Border City. The late husband of the deceased served as mayor of International Falls from 1922-24 and was long active in municipal and fire department affairs. He was employed as engineer-custodian of Alexander Baker school for 32 years. Mr. McDonald died Dec. 11, 1949.

This is what Sarah’s daughter said about her mother when I visited her in 2000:

Her mother came from Pembroke, Ontario, Canada. She remembers going back to visit her grandmother Catherine who lived in a big brick house in Pembroke with her son whom Mary called “Uncle George.” Mary said that George was wealthy. Sarah was very social and she kept a good home and always had help around the house. Sarah was known as Mrs. McDonald, probably a gesture of respect. Her mother would cook and set a nice table. Jack and Sarah’s home was a social place for the town, people were always coming over and stopping by.

The spelling of Sarah’s middle name was shown as “Mariah” in the Koochiching County Courthouse records.

Sarah was a member of a very well-known and large family in the Pembroke,  Renfrew County, Ontario and Chichester, Chapeau areas of Pontiac County in Quebec.  They were the Burns family and my friend and almost cousin Elaine Burns Brown has featured them on her website at:  http://www.personainternet.com/etbrown/  I also have this under my links specifically:  Family History Websites of Interest on the right side of this blog.  I highly recommend that you go there and study her website it covers Burns, Hughes, Somerville, Gentle and also McDonald and more.


Jack and Sarah (Burns) McDonald Settle in Minnesota

August 16, 2012

Archie, Mary, Jack (John), Sarah and Nellie all settled in Bemidji, Beltrami Co., Minnesota first and lived there till about 1905. 

This is one of my favorite photos of Jack.  I do not know where it is taken but I think he looks very dapper.

Jack McDonald (John Archibald)

According to the Minnesota State Census for 1905, Jack and Sarah had relocated to International Falls, Minnesota.

Source:  Minnesota State Census, 1905, Village of International Falls, Twp. of Koochiching, Itasca Co., Minnesota, enumerated by Harvy Gale on June 30, 1905, Line 74, Sht#2, Image 269, Ancestry.com.

Line 74, McDonald, John A., male, age 36, born in Canada, both parents born in Canada, 4 yrs. in Minnesota, 8 months in International Falls, laborer. Line 75, McDonald, Sarah, female, age 31, born in Canada, both parents born in Ireland, 4 yrs in Minnesota, no occupation.

1905 Minnesota State Census for Jack & Sarah

Note:  Please note that Koochiching is not a county yet and it is part of Itasca County for about another year.  This means that if you are looking for records you need to consult Itasca County for the early years.

Meanwhile Archibald (Archie) and Mary McDonald, the parents, were still residing in Bemidji and their daughter Nellie was with them. 

Source:  Archibald McDonald Family, 1905 Minnesota State Census, Bemidji, Beltrami Co., Minnesota, ED#14, enumerated June 1, 1905, Ancestry.com.

#49 McDonald Archie, Lake Blvd, #1101, M., 70 years, white, born in Canada, lines thru parents birth with no data entered, location, resident 3 yrs., 9 mos.; same for district, occupation: retired.

#50 McDonald, Mary, Lake Blvd, #1101, Female, age 68, white, born in Canada, parents born in Scotland both, resident 3 yrs. 9 mos, same for district, retired.

#51 McDonald, Nellie, Lake Blvd, #1101, Female, age 30, white, born in Canada, both parents born in Canada, resident 3 yrs 9 mos., same for district, occupation: housekeeper.

In my post dated March 3, 2011 I wrote about John (Jack’s) birth – Archie & Mary’s Children:  John Archibald McDonald.  

I also wrote more about Jack and Sarah in the posted dated August 17, 2010 “Jack McDonald and Sarah Maria Burns!”  In this post I described the children of Jack and Sarah McDonald that I am aware of.  We suspect that there were more babies that did not make it or perhaps miscarriages. 

Sarah with a baby?

I also wrote about Bemidji in the post dated February 2, 2012 “Life in Bemidji.” In this post I featured the Bemidji city directory that I found at the Beltrami County Historical Society.  The page featured Archie and John for 1904.  The picture above was provided by Elaine Burns Brown. 

In the last post dated July 20, 2012, I talked about Jack and Sarah’s marriage.  I was unable to find any news about this event in the local newspapers, therefore, I speculate that sometime after August 1901 and probably before the winter set in they went to Glengarry County first.  This was so Archie could revisit his childhood home.  After this visit they made that final move to Minnesota.  They first settled in Bemidji living there for about 4 years or slightly less and then heading for International Falls.  Jack apparently went ahead by 8 months and may have been in International Falls by 1904.

I wonder how they traveled from Chichester? Did they take the train from Waltham down to Ottawa and the go by coach to Glengarry County.  It is fun to speculate.

This was a big move. 

As far as I can determine by the census, Archibald, Mary, Ronald and Grace, Jack and Sarah, Alexander and Nellie were all living in International Falls by 1905 or after.  Angus disappears after 1897 after he came back to Chichester for the birth of his daughter Helen Mary in August of that year.  He reappears in the Seattle 1910 U.S. Federal Census.  What he did between 1897 to 1910 I have yet to figure out.   

My family left behind many friends, memories and more in Canada, and I am afraid the ties slowly began to disappear as they continued to live in the United States.  Later on Robert R. McDonald, a son of Duncan McDonald, Mary’s brother’s family migrated to Bovey, Minnesota. 

If you are familiar with International Falls it is right on the northern border of Minnesota and it takes just a few minutes to cross the bridge to Fort Francis and you are back in Canada.  So they really didn’t wander that far from their Canadian roots.

Wikipedia has an article about the town of Fort Francis: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Frances

Here is information about the border crossing and a great picture of the bridge that crosses the Rainy River between International Falls and Fort Francis.  My hubby and I drove across that bridge when I visited there in 2000 meeting for the first time with Mary McDonald Louseau, Jack’s and Sarah’s daughter.  She was 87 years old at the time. 

http://www.ezbordercrossing.com/list-of-border-crossings/minnesota/international-falls-fort-frances/

Here is a picture that I took on our walk along the Rainy River.  I wanted to see what my Dad’s (Keith)  childhood might have been like and wondered if he played along this river.  There house was very close by.  He would have been very young, being born in March 1910.  Ronald left International Falls in 1915 and headed back to Canada ending up in Grand Prairie.  I have posted about these events in past posts.  My Dad might have played along this river being 4-5 years old at the time.  It is more likely that the older children like Gordon, Vivian, Miriam, Eddie and Jean had adventures along its shores.  I can see Gordon carefully holding his little brother’s hand as they walked along.  Yes, I am getting a little romantic in my musings!

Looking across the Rainy River to Canada


Ottawa and Gatineau Archives!

June 30, 2012

It was Thursday June 7,  2012 and I arrived in Ottawa around 5 pm.  My goal was the Albert House Inn on Albert Street just before Bronson. At the red light I managed to sneak this photo as I entered Wellington Avenue next to Elgin.  I have proof that this second visit was a beautiful sunny day and not a loud thunderstorm like on my first visit.

Wellington Street at Elgin

Getting to the Albert House Inn was not too hard till I got on Albert Street.  It is almost to Bronson and right before the Travelodge.  There is a little parking space at the front. I had to go around the block and when I came back I got my first and only honk from a local in Ontario or Quebec. HA!

Albert House Inn

Turning into their driveway is a little tricky for there is a big tree and it is narrow.  The parking is in the back and it is tight.  Fortunately a guest was just leaving so I got the best spot in the corner by the fence. 

The first floor

There is no entrance in the back to the inn.  You go to the front and up the very steep stairs through the front door.  Once inside the reception desk is to the right.  The attendant was very helpful and I was checked in quickly. She took me to my room on the 4th floor.  There is no elevator.  The staircases get shorter as you go higher.  She offered to help me bring my luggage in.  I took her up on it.  I also reduced the amount of luggage leaving my big piece in the car.  She carried the smaller one and put it in my room for me. 

My room was lovely with a big bed, a desk and a separate room for the toilet from the shower (tiny) and sink.  There was this very big screen TV in the room perhaps a little too big for the size of the room? They had one of the ductless heating and air-conditioners and I had to adjust it a little so it would not blow on me.  I had one window that was normal size and the other was 18 x 18 inches.  It had the best view.

My little window from my room on the 4th floor

Once I was settled in I headed out for dinner.  The Bay Street Bistro was just down the block on the other side of the street. I sat outside because it was a lovely warm day in Ottawa.  The next day it would be raining. While I was sitting there a large group of teenagers came to the entrance.  They had to send them through and by my table into the restaurant.  I think there were at least 30 of them.  My dinner was delicious and probably the 2nd best dinner on my trip. 

The Bay Street Bistro Al fresco

As I sat at the Bay Street Bistro, I noticed this cloud reflected in the building across from me.  

Reflections in glass

Breakfast was service in the basement of the Albert House Inn 5 levels down.  It is included in the room price. The first day Friday, the room was a little too crowded so I decided to get a cup of coffee and return to my room.  I did have breakfast later and it was delicious.  They do offer an assortment of food choices which is nice and they will cook you breakfast like pancakes or eggs.  Saturday the room was much better and I had a lovely chat with a man who was from British Columbia. 

Friday morning came and I had a decision to make. 

What archive would I visit?  There are more possibilities like cemeteries and church archives than the list below offers but it was what I was considering including a little sightseeing. 

1.  Library and Archives which was just a couple blocks away this time. I had been there for one day my first visit.  I could spend time in their Upper and Lower Canada land records microfilm which I believe is self-serve:  http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/index-e.html/

2.  The Ottawa Chapter of the Ontario Genealogical Society:  http://ogsottawa.on.ca/  They are at 100 Tallwood (near Baseline and Woodroffe). 

3.  The British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa:   http://www.bifhsgo.ca/ I have yet to jump the pond (Atlantic Ocean) but this might give me ideas. Also at 100 Tallwood. 

4.  The Ottawa Archives for the city of Ottawa are also at 100 Tallwood in Ottawa.  http://www.ottawa.ca/en/rec_culture/museum_heritage/archives/index.html

100 Tallwood, Ottawa

5.  The Ottawa Public Library, Cornwall Room http://biblioottawalibrary.ca/en/main/overview I could have studied their city directories for the other side of the family in search of Brown descendants.

6.  The Sir Carleton Branch of the UEL Association of Canada at 1547 Merivale Rd., Nepeau, Ontario. 

 7.  The Outaouais Regional Centre http://www.craoutaouais.ca/of the Bibliothèque et Archive Nationales Due Québec or as it is written on their website: Centre Régional D’Archives De L’Outaouais (CRAO) I have found that if I Google:  Outaouais Centre BAnQ it takes me to the main Bibliothéque et Archives Nationales Du Quebec website. 

8.  Société de généalogie de l’Outaouais (SGO):  http://www.genealogieoutaouais.com/

I decided to go to the Centre Régional D’Archives De L’Outaouais  in Gatineau and the Société de généalogie de l’Outaouais. Fortunately these two entities are at the same location and in the same room. 
 
It was not too hard to drive over to Gatineau.  I found my way by going around the block and north on Bay Street to Wellington to the Portage Bridge. Construction made it a little confusing as to the lane I was supposed to use. Once across the bridge you go under this very large building which I think is the government offices and proceeded north along the Blvd. Maisonneuve which turned into Blvd. Fournier and a little later on it became Gréber.  There was a blockage of construction and  I was forced to turn right onto Blvd. Maloney and Blvd. de la Gappe was one street over to the north. I believe I turned on Blvd. de “l’Hópital and right onto Blvd. de la Gappe.  I went east on de la Gappe till it ran out and turned left.  There are sign posts pointing the way. 
 
According to one website the building is called the Maison de la Culture de Gatineau. 

I had a little trouble online trying to find this archive but I can guarantee it is at this location.  If I recall there were several addresses for it and that is why it was confusing because I believe it moved.  The address: 855 boulevard de la Gappe, Gatineau (Québec) J8T 8H9, 819-568-8798 or 1 -800-363-9028.  Email: archives.gatineau@banq.qc.ca.   Time:  8 to 4:30 pm Monday through Friday.

The Centre and Society

The Centre Régional D’Archives De L’Outaouais (CRAO) is in the last building on Blvd. de la Cité to the left.  In other words, you go around the building to the north side.

There is a parking lot but you do have to park in certain rows (in the center) and obtain a permit if longer than 90 minutes (signs).  The SGO website has the form so you could download and fill it out to be ready. 

The building for the Outaouais Archive and more. From the parking lot looking toward Ottawa

When you enter the building do not go straight ahead or you will come to the public library for Gatineau-Bowater. 

The Archive is upstairs on the 2nd floor.  So go through the doors from the parking lot and turn left.  Proceed up the staircase or take the elevator to the 2nd floor.  Once on the 2nd floor go right and then left down the hallway.  Look for the two big yellow doors with the Room 211 sign.  There is a sign on the wall in the hallway but it is a bit confusing.  Go right.  The reader board in the lobby is confusing, go to the 2nd floor.

The Outaouais Archive of Quebec

This is when you need to make a decision.  To talk to the volunteer of the Société de généalogie de l’Outaouais or not.  It depends on whether you have French Canadian lineage or have English ancestors who settled in Quebec. My interests were anything to do with Pontiac County, Quebec.  

Apparently the man behind the large counter area did not speak English and he did have a sort of frightened look on his face when the lady who was helping me from the administrative offices took me to the Room 211.  I was confused as to where to go. She was very nice but also spoke little English. 

I was introduced to a volunteer for the genealogical society who had been seated at the desk in front of the big counter area.  

He started by telling me he did his “genealogy online and why was I there?” When I mentioned obtaining deeds he said “why?” I tried to talk to him but he just would not listen.  He didn’t realize that my McDonald booklet was for the archive so he left it on the desk.  When I approached the 2nd volunteer who had taken over later in the day.  I discovered this miscommunication and explained it was for the archive, he assured me it would be given to their president.  This means it was given to the society not the actual archive.  Since they share the space I am hopeful it will be available for access by all who use the facility?

How to use this facility to the best of my ability.

1.  Go here first.  It gives and overview description of what is at this archive and their partner the SGO: http://www.banq.qc.ca/collections/genealogie/ressources_documentaires_salle/centre_archive/centre_outaouais.html?language_id=1

2.  Study the database Pistard at BAnQ for what is at the Outaouais centre.  I do not know if the SGO’s collection is on this database.  http://pistard.banq.qc.ca/unite_chercheurs/recherche_simple

3.  Study the website links for CRAO and SGO which I gave above.

4.  Get your parking permit and make sure your car is parked correctly if you will be there longer than 90 minutes.

5.  Get a locker because you can’t take your computer case into the research room.  The lockers are in a small room outside the two big yellow doors of Room 211.   Do not loose your locker key.

6.  As them to give you a tour of the centre.  I didn’t do this and regret it.

7.  There are finding aids in the facility and they are located on the top of cabinets. 

8.  There are BAnQ brochures and I took even the French versions because they didn’t have any English out.  Again I should have asked if they had English versions somewhere. 

  • Guide du chercheur:  A square-shaped brochure has the facilities map in back.
  • Le guide de l’abonnement
  • Les services à distance
  • Bibliothéque et Archives Nationales du Québec
  • Les collections partimoniales et les fonds d’archives
  • This one was in English:  Guide to subscriptions

What follows is a map of the Outaouais Facility that is a little out of date but close to what was there. 

A map of the centre

You can only access the centre through the two big yellow doors at the bottom left of the map which is blue.  The locker room is labeled M.  It is outside in the hallway. 

Everything else is inside this centre – the blue area. Bathrooms in the hallway outside of the centre.

  • F is the audiovisual.  The door to the right is a hallway door to other offices?
  • E is the periodicals and magazines
  • A is slightly different and more circular now and has computers as well. 
  • This maps does not show the desk for the SGO.  It is right before the black strip in the corner beyond A on the bottom of the map.
  • C is the stacks of books. SGO’s collection is there and then the Archives is too but apparently they are in different locations in these stacks.  I was not clear about that.
  • D is where the family histories are.  The first row facing into the center of the room.  Also if memory serves they house the cemetery books?
  • B is the computers and desks.  I don’t remember the two tables between B and K.
  • Tables to sit at are over by the windows at the top a good 7 big tables.
  • G is a conference room
  • H is  Cabinets de Travail??
  • I Table lumineuse??
  • K is the maps and plans and table for consulting them
  • L is where the one and only copier is located.  Have change.  I don’t remember a copy card function.
  • J is the big microfilm and microfiche room with cabinets holding newspapers and more.
  • The big lime green area behind a big counter which is represented by the black strip in an L shape. In that is where the individual sits.  I believe he is the archivist or an assistant?  The other desks in the back I do not know what they are about. 

The SGO 2nd volunteer was very nice and pleasant.  He tried to help me find notary records on the stacks but he was not able to.  So that meant I had to wait for the archivist who had left and didn’t return for a very long time.  

When he did I asked him about notaries.  He did not speak English very well but I had written down what I wanted.  I figured he could read English.  He read my notes and was off to his desk to obtained a copy of an index of Notaries. It was a copy of a very large index book but only looked like it was the pages for this area. I will talk about this in a future post.

As I was copying a researcher was stacking books by the copier.  She spoke to me in French and I said I was almost done and she immediately apologized and said she didn’t realize I didn’t speak it.  She was very nice and I was tempted to ask her about the centre.

I studied their family histories in the D area and didn’t find anything on McDonald or is various spellings.

My visit was not the best but at least I had a visual idea of the archive and I could go from there.  I was tired and my level of patience was gone.  However, I do think that this centre needs to work on their customer service.

I headed back the way I came and found a McDonald’s on Maisonnneuve.  I ordered my lunch and the young lady who served me said something to me in French that I interpreted as “enjoy.”  It was not Bon Appetit.  I read the Ottawa paper in English while I listened to French radio and TV.  I was happy.

I targeted  the Parc Jacques-Cartier on Rue Laurier to see if I couldn’t get a picture of Ottawa from that side of the river.  I was right I could see Ottawa from their parking lot.

Ottawa from the parc in Gatineau

Another view a little more to the east.  The weather had improved.

Looks like a fortress

I returned to the Albert Street Inn, parked the car and headed to my room on the 4th floor. HA!  I was back out on the street in no time to go for a walk and find some dinner.  I really needed a good glass of wine. The Bay Bistro was a possibility but it was still a little damp from the day’s rain and I wanted to explore Ottawa one more time.  I headed for Slater Street part of which is a mall area.  I featured it in one of my posts of Ottawa.

I had not intended to go all the way to D’Arcy McGee’s but I did. So I decided to have my last dinner in Ottawa at this establishment and hoped that the rain would not send us scrambling. At first it was very cold and I thought I should go inside but all of a sudden the wind stopped and I was fine.

A threatening cloud over D’Arcy McGees

On the way back I went over to Wellington and walked along enjoying the Parliament buildings. This following picture is taken at that time.

The cloud was still making things very dark over the capital building.

This picture was taken several weeks ago when I visited Ottawa the first time.  The building on the right has scaffolding.  By the time I returned to Ottawa it was all the way to the top.  See the photo from D’Arcy McGees above.

The capital building the first visit to Ottawa

Saturday June 9, 2012 was my last day in Canada for now.  It was time to checkout, pack up and head to the airport.  

I did try to go to the Ottawa Chapter of the OGS but the building was closed for regular maintenance.  Well, I had changed my plans so you can expect this type of problem.  I was not that disappointed.  See the picture above for 100 Tallwood.

So I spent most of my time at Digby’s Restaurant on Bank St. below Heron waiting, relaxing and reading my NookColor.  The waitress was okay with my dithering and around 1:30 pm I paid my bill and headed to the Ottawa Airport via the Airport Parkway and started remembering leaving the airport my first day. 

I followed the signs to the car rental return.  They don’t have those gates with the big teeth on the ground.  I turned in the Dodge Caliber at Hertz and was told I had done 2117 miles.  This was a record. No wonder I was tired. HA!

At ticketing I had to adjust the weight of my large luggage bag it was 57 lbs. and she refused to accept it.  So I put some things in the smaller one and adjusted it and I made it but it meant I had to carry some items with me and that was going to be tiring.  Usually I ship things back home saving me this problem but I was a little afraid it was going to cost a lot. 

The next hurdle was customs.  No problem I was through in a snap.  I had made a list of the things I had purchased so I had something to work with.  Security was also easy and I was soon at the gate.  It is not that far to the gates at the Ottawa Airport. 

Ottawa Airport Gate area

The plane was not full from Ottawa to Chicago.  As we took off I said “Good Bye” to Ontario and looked forward to getting home to my kitties.  In Chicago they changed the gate 4 times and once from C to B for my flight to Seattle.  My sister picked me up at the airport and I walked in the door at 12 midnight.

Home Sweet Home!  I think I was homesick this trip!


Prescott, Russell, The Ottawa River & Ottawa!

June 29, 2012

Once I reached Dalkeith my Tour of Glengarry was over.  I am so very glad I decided to explore more of the area.  Now it was time to face driving to Ottawa.  My first time to Ottawa was from the west to the east.  I would now be going from the east to the west so how shall I do this?

I decided to take a little tour of Prescott County which is part of the United Counties of Prescott and Russell:  http://www.prescott-russell.on.ca/fr/

In the past Prescott was part of Glengarry and Glengarry reached from the St. Lawrence River to the Ottawa River.  Prescott was formed in 1800.  In 1820 Prescott and Russell were consolidated as explained by the Prescott County Genweb page: http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~onpresco/ 

This link is to a great map of Prescott:  http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~onpresco/id11.htm

Here is the Russell County Genweb page: http://web.ncf.ca/de077/HomePage.GENWEB.html

I continued up Hwy #23 and it became Hwy #12 and met up with Hwy #10.  I turned west and started to dream of windmills.  There were cattle munching and I was thinking dairy land. 

Vankleek Hill’s welcome sign

I entered Vankleek Hill and was very surprised to find this lovely town on my route. The gingerbread capital of Ontario!  My stomach growled.  HA, it was architectural gingerbread not the cake.  http://vankleekhill.ca/ 

I parked my car on the street right across from the Champlain Library.  http://www.champlaintwplibrary.ca/  They have a small genealogy and local history collection.

The library in Vankleek Hill

I headed to the Trillium Tea Room.  I had been traveling all over Ontario and Quebec and had not had one spot of tea. Ice tea doesn’t count.  Well, I sat down and ordered a sandwich and tea and the waitress brought me a cup and saucer and a lovely little white teapot. 

Trillium Tea Room

The cafe had a lovely collection of mini teapots and sets.

Only a part of the collection

I had parked my car right next to the Musee Vankleek on Main Street:  http://www.vankleek.ca/ This is a great website with all kinds of information and some good links to genealogical treasures.

The historical society

My next destination was Hawkesbury.  I had always been curious about it and so I drove up Hwy #34 and it wasn’t that far. 

More of Vankleek Hill

I checked out the Hawkesbury Public Library which is on Higginson St. This the link to their genealogy collection:  http://www.bibliotheque.hawkesbury.on.ca/genealogy_en.html

 

Hawkesbury’s library

 

I headed for Main Street and the waterfront to see what it was like and I ended up in the parking lot of this huge catholic church.  It was another St. Alphonse Church.  I could see another church on John Street but that was on the street to the bridge into Quebec. 

St. Alphonse Catholic Church, Hawkesbury

The St. Alphonse Catholic Church was right next door to a restaurant – Tim Horton’s.  I wish I had taken a picture of that but I just didn’t.  I was getting tired.  This website has a picture of the church and gives a little history:   http://artbo.net/HikingHealthHistory/hawkesbury.html#52

I drove west on the Main St. of Hawkesbury and was impressed with the amount of activity in the main downtown area.  http://www.hawkesbury.ca/maineng.html  I really didn’t have time to take photos because of the traffic.

Hwy #4 was actually Main St. W. but it was what I wanted to take to go west.  I had planned to follow Hwy#4 to Hwy#24 and drive along the Ottawa River while I headed west to Ottawa.  Another name is Front St. W. 

“Hello again Ottawa River.”

The Ottawa River west of Hawkesbury

It was a lovely drive.  There were mostly houses along the river with big beautiful yards.  I sort of got the feeling that not that many tourists visit this area.

More of the Ottawa River

At some point I had to turn south on Hwy #9. It was at this point that I pulled into a very fancy house’s driveway and took a picture of the valley below.  I believe you are looking at Plantagenet. 

Plantagenet??

At the bottom of the hill I turned on to Hwy #17 and it was on that road all the way to Ottawa.  It went through Rockland and when it met up with Hwy #47 or 10th Line Rd. I turned onto Hwy #34 or St. Joseph Blvd. and that became Montreal Rd.  This road goes right into Ottawa and becomes Rideau.  I was familiar with Rideau having stayed in the Econo-Lodge between Chapel and Augusta on my visit to this city two weeks ago.

I did get stuck in a little bit of traffic on Rideau and Wellington but at least I knew where I was and what I was doing. 

My destination was the Albert House Inn on Albert Street before Bronson Ave.  I had decided to indulge a little in a B&B on my second visit to Ottawa.


Touring Glengarry: Lochiel, Glen Sandfield, Dalkeith

June 29, 2012

It was not easy to leave Kirkhill, I was enjoying St. Columbia and the Kirkhill United Churches but I had to move on.  I went east on  Hwy #24 to the Old Military Road and south to Lochiel.

The Sign post in Kirkhill

As I came up to Hwy #21 there was no sign of a church spire?  So I turned onto the Lochiel Road and went west. If that didn’t work I would go the other direction till I found the cemetery and church.

Within a few minutes I came past some trees and there was a beautiful old red house on the left with gables and a round window at the top.  On my right was the church. St. Alexander’s Catholic Church.

St. Alexander’s Catholic Church

The long walk to the church.  This church was different from all the others, it was made of wood not brick.

The church of St. Alexander’s

The cemetery was in the back of the church through a gate, which I almost thought was locked but it wasn’t. The church is beautiful from this angle.

The cemetery in the back of the church

An overview photograph of this cemetery.  I have more pictures and will post them when I finish this trip.

A bench is provided for reflection

UPDATE 7/9/2012:  Here is a link to more overview photographs of this cemetery with some McD* tombstones and more. 

St. Alexander’s RC Church & Cemetery, Lochiel, Ontario

Hwy #21 goes east and west, I headed east and did the job in the road to Glen Sandfield Road which took me into Glen Sandfield.  I had to visit if briefly this hamlet because of the name “Sandfield.”  My grandfather was named Ronald Sandfield McDonald.   So far I have not been able to find a connection to the “Sandfields.”

Glen Sandfield

Hwy #21 meets Hwy #23 and I paused at the 4 corners of Glen Sandfield then I turned north.

Four corners in Glen Sandfield

I was soon in Dalkeith.

Entering Dalkeith

Over the hill is the Dalkeith Library a branch of the S.D.&G. County Libraries.  It was closed opening at 4 pm to 8 pm.  To late for me.  http://www.sdglibrary.ca/index.cfm?Title=LibBranchDalkeith

This library is the home of the Dalkeith Historical Society:  http://acorn2011.com/

The Dalkeith Library, a branch of S.D.& G. County Libraries

A beautiful meadow near Dalkeith.

A lovely view near Dalkeith

Dalkeith was the end of my Tour of Glengarry.  It was time to headed to Ottawa.  I only had two days left of my trip and the next day I wanted to visit one more archive in the Ottawa area.  The next day I would fly home.


Touring Glengarry: Kirkhill

June 29, 2012

So far I had visited the historical townships of  Charlottenburgh, Kenyon, Lancaster but not Lochiel.

According to the locals it is pronounced “Laheel.”  It is the best way I can present it to you.

Remember that Charlottenburgh and Lancaster are part of the The South Glengarry municipality and their website does have some history of the area.  http://www.southglengarry.com/  Click the link “Visitors.”  They also feature their communities.  Kenyon and Lochiel are part of the North Glengarry site: http://www.northglengarry.ca/en/

I headed up Hwy #34 passed the sign for St. Raphael’s and through Green Valley and Alexandria and kept going north till the road started to curve at McCrimmon to the right.  I was still following Hwy #34.  The highway started to curve left and I turned right onto Lochinvar Rd.  I came to the Old Military Road and went south to the Laggan-Glenelg Rd. or Hwy #24. Apparently this highway has a jog in it because it was the same one for Dunvegan.

A view of Lochiel

Off in the distance were two spires and two churches.  It was…WOW!  My heart started to pump.  I am so glad I decided to tour more of Glengarry.  This was worth it.  Absolutely lovely.

Can you see the spires?

When I was in Pembroke and at the Upper Ottawa Valley Genealogical Group library I found a family history in which the writer wrote about the Roman Catholic and the Presbyterian Scots.  He two columns of names listing the Presbyterian Scots on one side and the Roman Catholic on the other.  Then he had arrows pointing to intermarriages.  It really hit home to me that you do need to consider both of these religious groups when you do your genealogical research in Canada.  I learned that Rev. Bethune did marry and baptize children in the Roman Catholic faith for he was the only one in the area for a great while.

St. Columba Church and the modern world

St. Columba Catholic Presbyterian Church is on the south side of Hwy #24.  I turned off Old Military Road and headed west turning left into the parking area.

St. Columba’s welcome sign

The church and cemetery.

UPDATE:  Please note that I mispelled the name St. Columbia.  It should be St. Columba.

St. Columba and its cemetery

The cemetery surrounds the church from the left around the back to the right.  A wooden stand located in the front of the church holds a copy of the St. Columba Cemetery Register publication inside it protected from the elements.  It is there on the honor system so please leave it for others to use.

The book of the cemetery inside this!

Many of the stones say things like this one.

All Natives of Glenelg, Invernesshire, Scotland

UPDATE 7/9/2012:  Below is a link to more photographs taken on this trip to this cemetery.  They are emphasizing McD*’s in the various spellings of the surname.  Most are overview photographs to give a sense of the location.  UPDATE:  1/9/2013 – I fix the title of the Picasa web album removing the RC from it.

St. Columba Church & Cemetery

Across the highway and a little further east is the Kirkhill United Church.

The Kirkhill United Church

A closer look at this church.

Kirkhill United Church

An overview of the cemetery.  They also have a stand that holds a copy of the cemetery book.  Please use it and leave it there for others.

Kirkhill United Church cemetery

I have more photographs of each of these cemeteries and will upload them when I finish posting about this trip to Ontario and Quebec.

UPDATE 7/09/2012:  Below is a link to more photographs of this cemetery.  These are overview photographs and some stones emphasize the McD* surname.

Kirkhill United Church & Cemetery

St. Columba in the distance from the Kirkhill United Church.

St. Columbia in the distance


Touring Glengarry: Cornwall to South Lancaster

June 29, 2012

It was Thursday, June 7, 2012 and I had just three days left on my trip to Ontario and Quebec.  I had to be in Ottawa in the evening so I wanted to make the most of my tour from Cornwall to Glengarry to Ottawa.

As usual I was up early and had the car packed.  I gave the key to the owner and realized she had a nice pot of coffee in the lobby so I took advantage and poured myself a cup.  I said my goodbyes to her, a very nice lady, and started to explore the area where the Monte Carlo Motel is located.

The St. Lawrence River is right there across Hwy #2 and there isn’t much land between Hwy #2 and the river.  As I crossed over being careful to watch out for the morning commuters, I was surprised to find a dock area.  Apparently you can dock your boat at the Monte Carlo Motel and stay the night.

The St. Lawrence River across from the Monte Carlo Motel

Here is a website with history and interesting information about this great river:  http://www.vsr.cape.com/~powens/riverhistory.htm

An of course, Wikipedia has this to say and it does have pictures: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Lawrence_River

Cruising the St. Lawrence wouldn’t that be nice:  http://www.stlawrencerivercruise.com/index.cfm?page=cruise_ktq

I didn’t wish to disturb the man who was on the docks enjoying the sunny morning air and view.  I love mornings especially this kind of morning.  It was so peaceful and lovely.

A lone man on the dock

The St. Lawrence to the east.

The St. Lawrence to the east.

The St. Lawrence to the west sort of…

The St. Lawrence to the west, sort of

Just before I arrived at South Lancaster you will find the Cooper Marsh Conservation Area http://www.rrca.on.ca/view.php?id=52  Try using Google Images to take a look at some really great pictures of this area.  I would have loved to explore it with my sister a docent at the Woodland Park Zoo here in Seattle.

The park of the Cooper Marsh area

I had been by South Lancaster earlier in the week but this time I didn’t just follow Hwy #2 which curves up leading you into Lancaster and then east paralleling Hwy #401 MacDonald-Cartier Freeway, I stopped at the sign announcing South Lancaster and proceeded along the Old Montreal Rd.

The sign to South Lancaster

I turned south on Cairn View Rd. and came to the South Lancaster Wharf.

The Wharf in South Lancaster

The wharf juts out into Lake St. Francis.  http://www.cruiserswiki.org/wiki/Lake_st_francis

The Wharf is very long

There were two men walking their dogs and we visited briefly while I introduced myself to their companions a beautiful Collie and a cute little white dog.

South Lancaster’s Wharf

About this location near the wharf, Ms. Dumbrille writes  in her book Up and Down the Glens on page 8:

“It was in the midst of these hard times that two ships bearing a body of emigrants from Scotland set out for Upper Canada (or Canada West as it was now called). One of these, the Macdonald, it carried 560 passengers –the entire parish of Knoydart, in Glengarry — in charge of their priest, Father Alexander Macdonell.  Brought up the St. Lawrence from Quebec in military bateaux, they landed at a sport near Lancaster, and were piped ashore and welcomed by their kinsmen amid scenes of rejoicing.”

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~onglenga/ShipMcdonaldSettlers.pdf

Lake St. Francis, South Lancaster

So far I have not found a plaque or anything indicating where in the area of South Lancaster they actually landed.  The descriptions are vague as to the actual events.

I left the area of the wharf and proceeded along Water Street and on my left was a stone wall and fence surrounding a cemetery.  I believe this to be the Old Cemetery in South Lancaster on Waters Street.

The Old Cemetery, South Lancaster

On Church St. I found the church and graveyard. St. Andrews Presbyterian Church founded in 1787 by Rev. Bethune, this is not the original church:  http://pccweb.ca/standrews-southlancaster/

St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, South Lancaster

A little humor. (Click and the photo will get larger, use your back button to return to this blog.)

Notice the sign!

The cemetery next to the St. Andrews Church is surrounded by a white metal fence. I have more photos which I will upload when I finish posting for this trip.

The cemetery next to St. Andrews, South Lancaster

A memorial plaque 1787 to 1855 to 1987 :

In Honor of the Church

Update 7/8/2012:  Here is a link of all the photographs I took of these two cemeteries in South Lancaster which were a few blocks apart.  These are overview photographs to give an idea of the location of these cemeteries.

Old Burial Ground & St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church & Cemetery

My tummy was calling so I continued on my journey, saying Good Bye to the St. Lawrence River, for now.  I headed north up Hwy #2 across the big freeway #401 and over to the right was a very shiny new Travel Plaza that housed a Denny’s? It also had a store called “Flying F,”  which had just about anything in it that you might want.  Exit #814 on the north side of the freeway. I found my T-Shirts that had just “Canada” on them.  It was a good thing, I needed clean shirts.  They have a whole line of Shell gasoline pumps.  So I stopped had breakfast and filled up the Caliber.  The Denny’s has WiFi.  They also have showers in the other part of this complex.

The Flying J, Exit 814 of 401

I was now content.  I could continue on my tour of Glengarry.


Last Night in Cornwall, A turn of events and a lovely view!

June 28, 2012

It was time to make a decision.  Go to Montreal or do more exploring of Glengarry.  I was very tired and I really wanted to see as much of Glengarry as I could.  I had not been to the northeast part – Lochiel. 

So where was I going to stay this one night?  Well as I was driving back to Cornwall on Hwy #2 I came up to a motel right on the St. Lawrence River. 

The Monte Carlo Motel

It was the Monte Carlo Motel.  It is right there on Bryden Ave and Hwy#2.  I pulled in and the proprietor saw me and I was in luck.  She had a room for one night.  It is not a fancy motel but it is clean, tidy and the owner is very nice.  Most importantly it is right on the St. Lawrence. 

I unloaded my belongings and prepared to head out to Cornwall for this was the day that I was going to the Cornwall Room.  I posted about that before. 

So now I could tour more of Glengarry and head back to Ottawa in a more leisurely manner than I had planned. 

It meant I was not going to the Quebec Family History Society in Pointe-Claire and visiting the Archives Centre Montreal on 535 Viger Avenue East. http://www.banq.qc.ca/accueil/index.html 

I would have to figure something else out and be better prepared. 

Later on in the day I made my way past the Monte Carlo Motel along Hwy#2 to the Blue Anchor Lounge.  I had spotted it before and was curious.  It was a beautiful sunny day and the St. Lawrence was calling and so was my tummy.

I pulled into the parking lot on the side and saw the wonderful deck out back.  Perfect, absolutely perfect for sitting and having dinner, a glass of wine and enjoying the St. Lawrence.

I positioned myself under the eave of the deck and this is what I saw:

The view from my table at the Blue Anchor Lounge

Along came a big ship and it made good time.

A boat is coming!

Closer yet…

Closer yet and moving fast

A happy end to a busy day.


Touring Glengarry: Lancaster

June 28, 2012

While I write this post, I am munching on Lankaaster, aged Vieilli cheese and crackers.  I purchased it at the Glengarry Fine Cheese store north of Lancaster.  http://glengarryfinecheese.com/

Fine Cheese in Glengarry

These are the experiences that make a trip so worthwhile.  To enjoy the local products.  I would have purchased more but travel can make it difficult.  My little brick made it home and through security and to the USA.

The road in to and the sign – Lancaster

It is very flat around Lancaster. 

A Lancaster view

I was going in search of the Lancaster Library.  It is actually a branch of the S.D. & G. County Libraries. 

The Lancaster branch of the S.D.&G. County Libraries

The library is situated on the main street of Lancaster. The website gives a listing of the locations of the S.D.&G. Libraries with hours and more.   http://www.sdglibrary.ca/index.cfm?Title=Hours  

The main street in Lancaster

I just stumbled onto this today: 

 http://www.facebook.com/pages/SDG-County-Library/250998401616550 

There is a S.D.&G. Branch in Cornwall.  It is apparently the Administrative Offices and they are on Facebook. I also found that there are a lot of Video Tutorials on You Tube for this library system. 

My goal in this library was to see what it had in genealogical sources.  I entered the library and much to my surprise I saw Penny.  She is the person I met at the Glengarry Archives.  I was very happy to see her.  We chatted happily. 

The Local History section of this library is in a little room off to the left as you enter.  It is not a very big library but it was comfortable. 

This the section for genealogy at the Lancaster Library

 I finished up at the Lancaster Library and headed out.  here are some views of the area around Lancaster.  

One of many farms in the Glengarry area

Green and flat


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