Quebec Wanderings: Lancaster to Pointe-Claire, Quebec…

October 1, 2014

There is a gas station, store and Denny’s on the north side of 401 at Lancaster, Ontario. One stop shopping.  This time they didn’t have any good Canadian T-shirts for me to buy, grrrr….  I did ask for help in checking the oil in my rental car and they had an attendant.  It was good.

The Truck Stop in Lancaster

The Truck Stop in Lancaster

On my last trip I had planned to go into Montreal but I was too tired and decided instead to concentrate on Glengarry and visit as many of the churches and cemeteries as I could.  So I cancelled my reservations in Quebec and found the Monte Carlo Motel on Hwy 2 in Cornwall and luckily they had a room.  So I stayed there for one night and was able to tour around the Glengarry area before I headed back to Ottawa to return the car and fly home.

I had dinner one of the evenings at the Blue Anchor Bar and Grill and this big ship came chugging by.  They don’t mess around for it was gone in about 20 minutes.

Big Tanker on the St. Lawrence

Big Tanker on the St. Lawrence

View from the Blue Anchor Bar & Grill

View from the Blue Anchor Bar & Grill

This time I was determined to make it to Quebec and Montreal.  So on Sunday, September 21 I headed to Pointe-Claire, Quebec.  After breakfast at the Denny’s I filled up the tank with gas and I headed east on Hwy 2 and immediately ran into a barricade.  I then had to find the detour which took me to the south side of 401 and the Service Road.  I followed that out and was back on Hwy 2 soon.  It was not great traveling weather as you can see from the photo below.

Morning on the St. Lawrence

Morning on the St. Lawrence at the Monte Carlo

I entered Quebec and the sign changed from Hwy 2 to Hwy 338.  I passed through several towns Les Coteaux and Coteau-du-Lac.  The name of the road changed to Chemin du Canal. It is called the Soulange Canal which flows along this area. It is very straight and it was raining as I drove by.

I was soon in Pointe-des-Cascades and I wandered around that little town for a while.  People were out walking their dogs or should I say…le chien.  I saw this cat, la chat, running across this park and it looked like it was pursuing the man and his dog.  Cats do like to go for walks too, my Puffer often followed me.

The road curves north at Pointe-des-Cascades and I found a little side road that took me where I could take pictures of the Ottawa River (Outaouais).  This is where the Ottawa meets the St. Lawrence. There were many lovely homes along this road.  It was very dark, dreary and rainy.

The Ottawa River off of Hwy 338

The Ottawa River off of Hwy 338 – Quebec

Hwy 338 took me up to Hwy 20 and I crossed over the Outaouais River to Perrot Island. Sainte-Anne de Bellevue came up very quick and I turned off to follow the Chemin Lakeshore road.

What a kick! This was a small two lane road that stopped about every 2 blocks (Arret) with a stop sign.  There were houses and some where like little castles, small green parks and views of the St. Lawrence or Lac St. Louis, small towns areas like Baie d’Urte. I kept following this road till it brought me to Beaconsfield.  The road from there became the Beaconsfield Blvd.  I stopped to get some supplies and found this wonderful cream for my coffee.  It was labeled in French so I had to figure out if it was whipping cream by the little drawings on it and I picked the other offer.

A glimpse of the St. Lawrence River

A glimpse of the St. Lawrence River

Unfortunately, I ran into another barricade and had to do a detour which took me around restaurants like the Ye Old Orchard that I had wanted to visit.  The detour finally brought me back to Blvd. St. Jean.  This is where I needed to turn north and head for the Comfort Inn.  Boy was I was really early.  The clock said 11:30 am much earlier than I had anticipated I would get there but then the weather was so bad I didn’t stop to take more photos.

I continued up Blvd. St. Jean and it changed from two lanes to four lanes and things got real busy.  I turned on Holiday St. into the Comfort Inn parking lot just below Hwy 40 near Blvd. Hymus.  The room was ready so I settled in and did the laundry and worked on my blog posts and rested. The next day would be a big day at the Quebec Family History Society and then I would drive into Montreal.

Remember to breath kiddo…yeah I was a little intimidated.  Here is the view from my hotel window.  I had fun watching the traffic and the day end and then checking the street in the wee hours to see it empty.

The area around the Comfort Inn in Pointe-Claire, Quebec

The area around the Comfort Inn in Pointe-Claire, Quebec


Ontario Wanderings: The Glengarry area…Again…

September 30, 2014

The highway that follows the St. Lawrence in Glengarry is one of my favorite places.  I like the gentle drive along the waterfront with the St. Lawrence on one side and the houses either on the water or set back.

The St. Lawrence River

The St. Lawrence River

There are little docks, with boats. I noticed that the signs had been updated to reflect the South Glengarry township change.  I still think of it as Glengarry County with the townships of Lochiel, Kenyon, Charlottenburgh and Lancaster.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glengarry_County,_Ontario

The New sign for Glengarry

The New sign for Glengarry

Since I had viewed a copy of Part IV of Duncan’s charts, I didn’t have to go into the Cornwall Public Library and the Cornwall Room.  I had been there in 2012 so I knew what they had and given them a booklet of my McDonald’s side.  I do recommend the Cornwall Room for genealogical research.  http://www.cornwall.ca/en/webadmin/publiclibrary.asp  I do want to warn you that the library’s website it not real helpful but you can go to their local history link and do searches. The Cornwall Room has limited hours so make sure you know those hours before you head out to this library in downtown Cornwall.  Parking is behind the library and you do have to feed the meter. http://library.cornwall.on.ca/

You can read about my first visit dated June 24, 2012 “The Cornwall Public Library’s Genealogical & History Collection.

The Genealogical Society of St. Laurent has moved to the basement of the Cornwall Library and I could go in and see if they were open for business and it looks like they might be keeping Saturday hours. http://genealogieetarchivessaintlaurent.ca/

You can read about my first visit to them in 2012 at this post dated June 24, 2012 “A Gem in the United Counties of S.D.&G: La Genealogie et archives Saint-Laurent Inc.”

I decided I needed some downtime and to rest so I hung around my motel room.  Now I stayed at this motel one night on my trip in 2012.  It is the motel Monte Carlo and it is right on the St. Lawrence River just a little past the main downtown area of Cornwall.  Now it is not a fancy motel but it is so convenient.  It is just beyond St. Anthony St. and a bit before Boundary Rd. and right on Hwy 2.  She put me in room #4 again and fortunately, things had improved since my last visit.  So I was happy.  http://www.montecarlomotel1700.com/  Now if you want breakfast you have to go out.  They did have coffee but I would plan to bring your own just in case.  I did have a microwave and refrigerator.

Motel Monte Carlo

Motel Monte Carlo

The Wharf at the Monte Carlo

The Wharf at the Monte Carlo

Just east along Hwy #2 is the Blue Anchor Bar and Grill.  I had found this restaurant on my last trip and had sat out on their veranda watching the boats go by.  I forgot one thing and that is it was fall this time not spring and it was a bit cool out there on their veranda but I persevered.  http://www.blueanchor.ca/ They are also on Facebook.

Blue Anchor Bar & Grill

Blue Anchor Bar & Grill

The veranda was a little cold

The veranda was a little cold

I had made arrangements to meet with someone at one of the little historical societies in the area but it didn’t work out.   I had hoped to ask a ton of questions but it didn’t happen and I have had a discussion with myself about being more careful.

However, I did get a little drive through the Glengarry area and when I turned off of Hwy 34 onto Hwy 24 and saw these church spires I realized that it was the St. Columba and Kirkhill Churches that I had visited the last time.  I had come south on the Military Road and saw them in the distance and was just blown away.  They were still pretty impressive.

St. Columba Church & Cemetery

St. Columba Church & Cemetery

In Alexandria I wandered around and found this lovely lake and another cemetery The United Church Cemetery.

Mill Pond

Mill Pond

United Church Cemetery in Alexandria

United Church Cemetery in Alexandria

I stopped at Dimitri’s for an early dinner.  It was a little stormy and windy so I ate my early dinner inside   Dimitri is in Summerstown and right on the St. Lawrence.  I decided to try a Greek plate and it was very good.  They said they would be offering breakfast starting in October so you might want to check it out.  Dimitri’s is a little east of Hwy 27 in Summerstown.

Anything having to do with MacDonells is something that I will take a few minutes to stop and study.  There is a plaque on the Hwy 2 for Lt. Colonel John MacDonell (Abercalder).  It is on the south side of the road.  You can pull into Stone House Point Road and park and then walk over to the plaque.  It you get to Rae Road you are either past or just about there depending on which way you are headed.

Plaque for John MacDonell

Plaque for John MacDonell

 

The Plaque for John MacDonald (Abercalder)

The Plaque for John MacDonald (Abercalder)

There are supposed to be remnants of the house he built-in this area but it is all private property so I did not try to venture further.  I did try to peek over the bushes but I could not see anything in the area that might be ruins.  Google Earth just sees lots of trees in the area.

There are lots of historical plaques in the area and one could spend a lot of time driving around and finding them.

http://www.historicplaces.ca/en/rep-reg/place-lieu.aspx?id=13373

Try these links.

http://www.ontarioplaques.com/Plaques_STU/Plaque_Stormont42.html or go here.

http://www.ontarioplaques.com/Locations/Location_DirectoryStormont.html

Here is a list of the posts and dates of my 2012 tour of the Glengarry, Ontario area.  You can find them using the archive box on the right of this blog.

  • At Last! Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry!, June 22, 2012
  • An Overview: Dundas, Stormont and the city of Cornwall, Ontario, June 24, 2012
  • The Cornwall Public Library’s Genealogical & History Collection, June 24, 2012
  • A Gem in the United Counties of S.D.&G: La Genealogie et archives Saint-Laurent, Inc., June 24, 2012
  • Cornwall Community Museum! June 25, 2012
  • Touring Glengarry:  Glengarry Archives & the Sir John Johnson House, June 26, 2012
  • Touring Glengarry: The Nor’Westers and Loyalist Museum, June 26, 2012
  • Touring Glengarry:  Williamstown, June 26, 2012
  • Touring Glengarry:  Dunvegan & The Glengarry Pioneer Museum, June 27, 2012
  • Touring Glengarry:  Alexandria “The Centre of Glengarry,” June 27, 2012
  • Touring Glengarry: St. Raphael’s, June 28, 2012
  • Touring Glengarry: Martintown, June 28, 2012
  • Touring Glengarry: St. Andrews West (Stormont), June 28, 2012
  • Touring Glengarry: Lancaster, June 28, 2012
  • Last Night in Cornwall, A Turn of Events and a lovely view!, June 28, 2012
  • Touring Glengarry: Cornwall to South Lancaster, June 29, 2012
  • Touring Glengarry:  Kirkhill, June 29, 2012
  • Touring Glengarry: Lochiel, Glen Sandfield, Dalkeith, June 29, 2012
  • Prescott, Russell, The Ottawa River & Ottawa!, June 29, 2012

Ontario Wanderings: The Brockville Museum & Leeds Grenville Branch of the OGS

September 30, 2014

I came home on Sunday September 28th and still have much to share about the remainder of my trip.  So keep reading.

Canada’s Highway 2 is a wonderful road.  I get to see the country side.  I was contemplating taking 401 but decided “NAH” it was more fun to do Hwy 2.  So from Kingston I headed east on Hwy 2 to Brockville. This time I didn’t do the Thousand Island Parkway road after Gananoque which meant I would be more in the country and the road would not get close to the St. Lawrence till it got to Brockville.  I did take the Thousand Island Parkway when I went this way in 2012 so if you wanted to read about it you could do so on this blog and it is when I fell in love with the St. Lawrence River.

Once I found the Brockville Museum, I went in search of food and found Bud’s on the Bay.  I had a nice fettucine with Shrimp.  It was very good.  Bonnie was in Brockville at Buds on the Bay….giggle…Silly me.

The Brockville Museum houses the Leeds & Grenville Branch of the OGS and they were opened at 1 pm.  At the museum’s front door I went to the right and into the next room turning left and then another left down steep stairs into the small area that is the Leeds and Grenville room.  I was greeted by Patti and she had a surprise for me.  http://www.leedsandgrenvillegenealogy.com/

The Brockville Museum

The Brockville Museum

Entrance to the museum

Entrance to the museum

On the table was Part IV, Duncan MacDonald’s collection of genealogical charts.  See my blog post on this blog dated September 2, 2014 “Sources to use for Untangling McDonell, MacDonald, MacDonell & McDonald families…”  In this post I listed 5 books that Mr. Duncan Darby MacDonald created and here is the one I am most interested in.

4.  **A collection of genealogical charts  Part-IV, 3rd Edition, ISBN O-921133-39-1.  Much of the earlier work done by Daniel F. McDonald of Bristol, Conn and other members of his family at Bridgend (Stone Villa) Lancaster.  A second edition was published in 1988 and the 3rd in 1993.  FHL#971.37 D2, book only.   

Patti and I chatted for a while about how the immigrants got from Quebec City to Montreal to various areas of Ontario and she said they could disembark at Prescott, Brockville, Kingston and even Toronto.  The Loyalists would usually settle by regiment.  Another person had told me that if you know the lot and concession number that is another piece of the puzzle.

The family histories

The family histories

I did not have much time so I proceeded to study the pages I was most interested in Chart #13 and made a quick list of the other charts that where referenced.  Then I started looking for those charts in the book which is very thick and took pictures.  Now I am probably not done with the book because those new charts may have other references.  Therefore, when I get back home I will need to get busy and study all this information.  I left one of my McDonald Booklets based on this blog with Patti for the collection.

Part IV Genealogical Charts.

Part IV Genealogical Charts.

Around 3 pm I packed up and headed out.  When I was there the last time a storm was brewing so I took a few minutes to take some new pictures of the little park and marina near the museum.

The St. Lawrence River at Brockville

The St. Lawrence River at Brockville

DSC09458

The main street in Brockville

The main street in Brockville

I took Hwy 2 again and I passed through Prescott, Johnstown, Cardinal, Iroquois, Morrisburg, past the Upper Canada Village, Ingleside and Long Sault.  I had driven this route in 2012 and kept hearing about the St. Lawrence Seaway and didn’t realize the impact that this had on the area.

Long Sault has the Lost Villages Museum http://lostvillages.ca/  The creation of the St. Lawrence Seaway flooded many villages and the inhabitants had to move.  The day was July 1, 1958 when the water was released.  The website gives a list of the cities and what happened.

The St. Lawrence Seaway: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Lawrence_Seaway


Ontario Wanderings: Kingston Frontenac Library

September 29, 2014

The following morning, I gathered my things and loaded up the car.

Kingston in the morning

Kingston in the morning

DSCN0154

It was a short walk over to the Kingston Frontenac Library on Johnson Street.  It was just north of the Diocese offices.

Kingston Frontenac Library

Kingston Frontenac Library

DSC09297

Their genealogy room is to the right at the far end on the first floor.

The announcement sign

The announcement sign

http://www.kfpl.ca/explore-online-resources/genealogy-resources

The Kingston Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society

http://www.ogs.on.ca/kingston/

The stacks and holdings

DSC09300

This is a pleasant, and quiet place to do research.  There are tables to work on.  I spent some time studying the stacks but that is not all they have so use the links above to explore.

It was now time to head further east and this time my goal was the Leeds & Grenville Branch of the OGS – Ontario Genealogical Society library which is housed in the Brockville Museum.


Ontario Wanderings: Revisiting Kingston in Ontario

September 29, 2014

After I left St. Catharines, I headed west to Hamilton and visited that city briefly stopping at the Hamilton Cemetery.  The first part of this trip was emphasizing my mother’s side of the family and her Boardman, Brown and Ward lines. You can follow my adventures on the Boardmans and Brown blog where I headed west all the way to Michigan in Lapeer County where George and Esther Brown settled and are buried.   After visiting Lapeer I headed back to Ontario heading to Toronto where I visited the Archives of Ontario and the North York Library where the Ontario Genealogical Society has their holdings.  Although I was working on the Browns, Wards and Boardmans these two last archives can be of help to me on the McDonald side.  So visiting them was a good thing.  I continued with the Brown family by visiting Peterborough, and then revisiting Hastings County where I had been on my trip in 2012.

In 2012 when I came to Kingston for the Ontario Genealogical Society Conference, I had contacted Elaine Brown and we had lunch.  We had been emailing on occasion over the years about the MacDonalds and Burns connection and this was my first time meeting Elaine face-to-face.

The Wharf in Kingston

The Wharf in Kingston

This time I would be in Kingston for only a short time and I invited Elaine to dine with me at the Keg Restaurant.  I had been working on the Brown family at the Anglican Diocese of Ontario on Johnson Street.  It had been a good day of research.

The marina in Kingston

The marina in Kingston

Elaine compiled the book on the burials and deaths of the St. Alphonsus Church in Chapeau, Pontiac Co., Quebec. I have referenced her book several times on this blog.  Elaine is a Burns and her family history has been her passion.

http://www.personainternet.com/etbrown/

Here is the link to her book.

http://www.personainternet.com/etbrown/alphonse.htm

Elaine and her hubby visited me in Seattle in July of this year, they had been on an epic road trip.  I traveled with them to Port Angeles on the Olympic Peninsula and I took them up the Space Needle.  We had excellent weather…

We had arranged to meet at the Keg about 6 pm and I was there a little early just relaxing and enjoying the ambiance.  It was good to see her happy face and share some more.

View from my hotel window

View from my hotel window

Back at my room I watched the harbour of Kingston grow quiet as the night came to the area.


Ontario Musings: Brock University and the Loyalist Collection

September 16, 2014

On Monday, September 8, 2014 I visited Brock University’s Special Collections.  They have a Loyalist Collection there.  My goal was to seek out information on Solomon Goss, my 4th great-grandfather who, according to the Pennsylvania history books was held prisoner at Forty Fort but escaped? I was hoping that Lt. Colonel John Butler the man who was responsible for this attack on the valley of the Susquehanna River in Pennsylvania would shed light on this subject of prisoners.

My father’s side has the potential for Loyalists to be included in his family tree. I do know that some members of the Goss family were Loyalists but I will talk about that subject in future posts on my Solomon Goss blog.

Here is the link to the Loyalist collection at Brock: http://www.brocku.ca/library/collections/special-collections-archives

and

http://www.brockloyalisthistorycollection.ca/

http://www.brockloyalisthistorycollection.ca/collection.html  scroll to the bottom and click on the link and you will get a very nice list.

My lodging for the night had been the Heritage House Bed and Breakfast in St. Catharines.  It is about five minutes from Brock.  It is on Edmond Street between Catherine and George Streets. It has steep stairs so keep that in mind.  It was very lovely and breakfast was delicious. I was well cared for.  Make sure you get all you need from your car they turned the lights out and it was very dark and I did not have a flashlight.

Heritage House B&B in St. Catherines.

Heritage House B&B in St. Catharines.

My route was west on Welland and south on Ontario and then south on Glenridge Road. I parked in the visitor parking turning right at the Brock University main campus sign.

Main campus sign Brock University

Main campus sign Brock University

My destination was the Schmon Tower and the 10th floor.  Visitor parking is at the entrance near the sign so you do have to walk well into the main park of the campus.

Once you are at the building go into the entry way and you will find the elevators.  It is a little tricky to get to the 10th floor.  Go past the elevators and through the doors on the left and walk around to the other side of the elevators and then you can go up.  You cannot access the upper floors from the first floor. You can see the upper floor elevators through the glass but you cannot go through the locked door.  I was fortunate because I ran into Dave the Archivist of the Special Collections and he knew who I was from my email to him a month ago.  So he took me up to the 10th floor and got me started.

Schmon Tower Brock University

Schmon Tower Brock University

My main task was to look at the John Butler Papers by Smy.  It was a transcription/abstraction of the correspondence and was in four volumes with dates.  I targeted Volume II 1778 to 1779, which had the Wyoming Valley information.  Mr. Smy had abstracted and transcribed a variety of letters not just from John Butler but other individuals.  It was very interesting.

Smy's books and volumes

Smy’s books and volumes

Source:  “The Butler Papers: documents and papers relating to Colonel Butler and his corp of rangers 1711-1977″ in four volumes, by William A. Smy, 1994.

Special Collections 10th floor, Brock University

Special Collections 10th floor, Brock University

I had written down my list of books and documents to review but was required to write it all down on their form.  So be prepared to spend about 10 minutes getting your order ready. I suppose you could ask them to scan and email you the form in advance, it is at least worth a try?

Now I could have looked at microfilm of the Haldimand papers but I decided that Mr. Smy was probably comprehensive enough to tell me that I was not going to get any details from Lt. Colonel Butler.  Mr. Smy has the UE initials and he may have left something out based on his perspective but I think he was probably very thorough.  I did take photos of the pages that interested me and will discuss this at a later date on my Solomon Goss blog.

Lt.  Colonel John Butler was writing from the perspective of a soldier reporting to his superiors and he wanted it to look good of course.  He was not interested in personalizing the individuals he attacked in New York or Pennsylvania.  To him they where rebels and nothing else. Remember I did say one country’s hero is another’ villain?

Here are a couple of titles I took a look at, not all:

“The Burning of the Valleys, Daring Raids from Canada Against the New York Frontier in the fall of 1780,” by Gavin K. Watt was a nice book, a little late for my Goss family but very interesting.  They seemed to think that the area of the Susquehannah was a New York dispute about land.  My understanding is that it was between Pennsylvania and Connecticut?

“An Annotated Nominal Roll of Butler’s rangers 1777-1784 with Documentary Sources,” compiled and arranged by Lt. Col. William A. Smy, OMM, CD, UE. This listed the soldier and then gave information about them.  I was particularly interested in McDonell’s.

“Loyalists & Early Settler on the Niagara River Parkway,” by Gail Woodruff U.E., 1968.  This book was well done and I really liked the sources which can give you ideas for research.  Here is a brief list:  Crown land papers, books about the subject and specific locations, Haldimand Collection, 17th report of the report of the Dept. of Public Records Archives of Ontario, The Niagara Gleaner (newspapers), wills, Heir and Devisee Commission etc.

The U.E.L. Association also has a page listing sources and that is a good place to start: http://www.uelac.org/

For those researching the very early years of the Glengarry area (Eastern or Lunenburg districts).  The McNiff Map is a must see.  This is an index on CD Rom.

McNiff Index CD

McNiff Index CD

“Index to the 1786 McNiff Maps of the Townships of Lancaster, Charlottenburgh, Cornwall, Osnabruck, Williamsburgh and Matilda (The Loyalist Maps),”  This is a CD and it is very good and it also includes information from the book  “Lunenburgh or the Old Eastern District Its Settlement and Early Progress.”  This last book is at Internet Archive.

There is so much more that one could research in this Loyalist collection.  This is not the only collection for Loyalists.  I will mention them as I travel along.

I did ask about the submission papers that an applicant would prepare and give to a loyalist organization.  I wanted to know where they keep these applications and how do you access them?  The special collections attendants didn’t know but I have seen books that abstract these applications and I assume that there may be privacy issues.  I also assume you may have to be a member to access them?  I do know that some Loyalist were just given the letters as an honor to them whether papers of where submitted later I do not know?

I encourage you to visit them at Brock they where all very helpful and welcoming on the Special Collections floor.  The Visitor parking is small so get their early.  The person who gathered up my choices was efficient and helpful pulling items quickly and piling them up next to me as she found them.

Once I had gone through reviewing my choices it was time to move on.  I stopped by the student cafeteria and purchased a hamburger.  Sitting in a university student cafeteria always brings back memories of my college days at Central in Ellensburg and at the University of Washington which was a long time ago.

The view north from the 10th floor.

The view north from the 10th floor, St. Catharines, Ontario

 


Ontario Wanderings: Heritage Site, The Steward House

September 14, 2014
The Seward House

The Steward House plaque

The Seward House - Niagara-on-the-lake

The Steward House – Niagara-on-the-lake

Sometimes you can be pleasantly surprised.  I don’t post about the underground railroad but I have come across it in my travels specifically in Ohio.  I had not really thought about the Canadian side of this question.  The sign is on Butler Street about a block down from the main road.

This link has some interesting information.

http://www.heritagetrust.on.ca/CMSImages/be/beef58ca-f187-4930-89a3-67d62ffeed70.pdf

 

 


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