Ontario Musings: Brock University and the Loyalist Collection

September 16, 2014

On Monday, September 8, 2014 I visited Brock University’s Special Collections.  They have a Loyalist Collection there.  My goal was to seek out information on Solomon Goss, my 4th great-grandfather who, according to the Pennsylvania history books was held prisoner at Forty Fort but escaped? I was hoping that Lt. Colonel John Butler the man who was responsible for this attack on the valley of the Susquehanna River in Pennsylvania would shed light on this subject of prisoners.

My father’s side has the potential for Loyalists to be included in his family tree. I do know that some members of the Goss family were Loyalists but I will talk about that subject in future posts on my Solomon Goss blog.

Here is the link to the Loyalist collection at Brock: http://www.brocku.ca/library/collections/special-collections-archives

and

http://www.brockloyalisthistorycollection.ca/

http://www.brockloyalisthistorycollection.ca/collection.html  scroll to the bottom and click on the link and you will get a very nice list.

My lodging for the night had been the Heritage House Bed and Breakfast in St. Catharines.  It is about five minutes from Brock.  It is on Edmond Street between Catherine and George Streets. It has steep stairs so keep that in mind.  It was very lovely and breakfast was delicious. I was well cared for.  Make sure you get all you need from your car they turned the lights out and it was very dark and I did not have a flashlight.

Heritage House B&B in St. Catherines.

Heritage House B&B in St. Catharines.

My route was west on Welland and south on Ontario and then south on Glenridge Road. I parked in the visitor parking turning right at the Brock University main campus sign.

Main campus sign Brock University

Main campus sign Brock University

My destination was the Schmon Tower and the 10th floor.  Visitor parking is at the entrance near the sign so you do have to walk well into the main park of the campus.

Once you are at the building go into the entry way and you will find the elevators.  It is a little tricky to get to the 10th floor.  Go past the elevators and through the doors on the left and walk around to the other side of the elevators and then you can go up.  You cannot access the upper floors from the first floor. You can see the upper floor elevators through the glass but you cannot go through the locked door.  I was fortunate because I ran into Dave the Archivist of the Special Collections and he knew who I was from my email to him a month ago.  So he took me up to the 10th floor and got me started.

Schmon Tower Brock University

Schmon Tower Brock University

My main task was to look at the John Butler Papers by Smy.  It was a transcription/abstraction of the correspondence and was in four volumes with dates.  I targeted Volume II 1778 to 1779, which had the Wyoming Valley information.  Mr. Smy had abstracted and transcribed a variety of letters not just from John Butler but other individuals.  It was very interesting.

Smy's books and volumes

Smy’s books and volumes

Source:  “The Butler Papers: documents and papers relating to Colonel Butler and his corp of rangers 1711-1977″ in four volumes, by William A. Smy, 1994.

Special Collections 10th floor, Brock University

Special Collections 10th floor, Brock University

I had written down my list of books and documents to review but was required to write it all down on their form.  So be prepared to spend about 10 minutes getting your order ready. I suppose you could ask them to scan and email you the form in advance, it is at least worth a try?

Now I could have looked at microfilm of the Haldimand papers but I decided that Mr. Smy was probably comprehensive enough to tell me that I was not going to get any details from Lt. Colonel Butler.  Mr. Smy has the UE initials and he may have left something out based on his perspective but I think he was probably very thorough.  I did take photos of the pages that interested me and will discuss this at a later date on my Solomon Goss blog.

Lt.  Colonel John Butler was writing from the perspective of a soldier reporting to his superiors and he wanted it to look good of course.  He was not interested in personalizing the individuals he attacked in New York or Pennsylvania.  To him they where rebels and nothing else. Remember I did say one country’s hero is another’ villain?

Here are a couple of titles I took a look at, not all:

“The Burning of the Valleys, Daring Raids from Canada Against the New York Frontier in the fall of 1780,” by Gavin K. Watt was a nice book, a little late for my Goss family but very interesting.  They seemed to think that the area of the Susquehannah was a New York dispute about land.  My understanding is that it was between Pennsylvania and Connecticut?

“An Annotated Nominal Roll of Butler’s rangers 1777-1784 with Documentary Sources,” compiled and arranged by Lt. Col. William A. Smy, OMM, CD, UE. This listed the soldier and then gave information about them.  I was particularly interested in McDonell’s.

“Loyalists & Early Settler on the Niagara River Parkway,” by Gail Woodruff U.E., 1968.  This book was well done and I really liked the sources which can give you ideas for research.  Here is a brief list:  Crown land papers, books about the subject and specific locations, Haldimand Collection, 17th report of the report of the Dept. of Public Records Archives of Ontario, The Niagara Gleaner (newspapers), wills, Heir and Devisee Commission etc.

The U.E.L. Association also has a page listing sources and that is a good place to start: http://www.uelac.org/

For those researching the very early years of the Glengarry area (Eastern or Lunenburg districts).  The McNiff Map is a must see.  This is an index on CD Rom.

McNiff Index CD

McNiff Index CD

“Index to the 1786 McNiff Maps of the Townships of Lancaster, Charlottenburgh, Cornwall, Osnabruck, Williamsburgh and Matilda (The Loyalist Maps),”  This is a CD and it is very good and it also includes information from the book  “Lunenburgh or the Old Eastern District Its Settlement and Early Progress.”  This last book is at Internet Archive.

There is so much more that one could research in this Loyalist collection.  This is not the only collection for Loyalists.  I will mention them as I travel along.

I did ask about the submission papers that an applicant would prepare and give to a loyalist organization.  I wanted to know where they keep these applications and how do you access them?  The special collections attendants didn’t know but I have seen books that abstract these applications and I assume that there may be privacy issues.  I also assume you may have to be a member to access them?  I do know that some Loyalist were just given the letters as an honor to them whether papers of where submitted later I do not know?

I encourage you to visit them at Brock they where all very helpful and welcoming on the Special Collections floor.  The Visitor parking is small so get their early.  The person who gathered up my choices was efficient and helpful pulling items quickly and piling them up next to me as she found them.

Once I had gone through reviewing my choices it was time to move on.  I stopped by the student cafeteria and purchased a hamburger.  Sitting in a university student cafeteria always brings back memories of my college days at Central in Ellensburg and at the University of Washington which was a long time ago.

The view north from the 10th floor.

The view north from the 10th floor, St. Catharines, Ontario

 


Ontario Wanderings: Heritage Site, The Steward House

September 14, 2014
The Seward House

The Steward House plaque

The Seward House - Niagara-on-the-lake

The Steward House – Niagara-on-the-lake

Sometimes you can be pleasantly surprised.  I don’t post about the underground railroad but I have come across it in my travels specifically in Ohio.  I had not really thought about the Canadian side of this question.  The sign is on Butler Street about a block down from the main road.

This link has some interesting information.

http://www.heritagetrust.on.ca/CMSImages/be/beef58ca-f187-4930-89a3-67d62ffeed70.pdf

 

 


Ontario Wanderings: Loyalists and the Niagara Area, Part I.

September 12, 2014

My dad’s ancestry goes back into Pennsylvania and into New England.  The Goss family was in the Wyoming Valley of Pennsylvania at the time of the Revolution.  I have been trying to find more proof that Solomon Goss my 4th great-grandfather was held prisoner than using the history books of the area which are not sourced.

As a result I have been a little determined to learn more about a man by the name of John Butler.  He was known in the Wyoming Valley as Captain but the Canadians have him listed as Lt. Colonel.  I will refer to him as Captain John Butler.

I refer you to my post dated June 12, 2012 “Revolution: Canada and the New United States:” I had some links in that post that are rather interesting.

http://sgossfamily.wordpress.com/2012/06/12/revolution-canada-and-the-new-united-states/

After enjoying the sights of the Niagara Falls area I headed north to Niagara on-the-Lake where Capt. Butler lived and died.  I traveled up Hwy 100 to Hwy 55 and turned right to Niagara-on-the-Lake.  I didn’t go into the town instead I turned left onto Balmoral Lane.  Be careful, they like to name the streets on one side of the road one name and on the other another name.  It was Balmoral and Anderson where I needed to turn.  It was a residential area and there was construction going on so I was momentarily confused.  I stumbled upon the statue which is located on the land where his house was situated until it was burned down in the War of 1812.  He had long since passed on before that event.  http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio.php?id_nbr=1785

Lt. Colonel John Butler, Niagara on the Lake

Lt. Colonel John Butler, Niagara on the Lake

The other side of the statue.

The other side of the statue.

John Butler Plaque

John Butler Plaque

Find the Homestead

Find the Homestead

The Homestead

The Homestead

Contributors

Contributors

Lt. Colonel Butler was given a commission to organize a militia and he created Butler’s Rangers.  I am interested in this not just from the Goss family history side but because there were McDonalds enlisted in his Rangers.  http://www.iaw.on.ca/~awoolley/brang/brhist.html A Captain John McDonell was head of one of the units.  These two men went on to make contributions to the establishment of Canada.

If you are studying or trying to find a Loyalist ancestor you will have no choice but to learn about Lt. Colonel John Butler, he was very involved in the establishment of the Niagara area and an Indian agent.  He was very devoted to his country, Great Britain.

 


Second Trip to Ontario has Begun….

September 11, 2014

My second trip to Ontario and surrounding areas has begun.  I am on the trail of my Boardman, Brown, McDonald and other families.  I recommend that you head over to the Boardman and Brown blog and follow along on my journey through Southwestern Ontario and beyond.  http://boardmanbrown.wordpress.com/

Blogging while traveling is a challenge so I will switch from blog to blog if the topic is more appropriate for that blog’s subject.  I will probably not complete my trip while on the trip so when I get back home I will finish up. You have another option to get to my posts by going to the right panel of this blog and you will find the links to my other blogs.

First stop is Niagara Falls, New York, I had to check out that big waterfall that is so famous. Hey two natural wonders of the world in one year, The Grand Canyon last June and Niagara Falls.

First glimpse of Horseshoe Falls.

First glimpse of Horseshoe Falls.


Eddie’s Collection of Junk: Graduation from Sacred Heart Nursing School 1928

May 29, 2014

Eddie completed her classes and graduated from Sacred Heart Nursing School on the 15th of May, 1928.

Eddie's Diploma from Sacred Heart Nursing School 1928

Eddie’s Diploma from Sacred Heart Nursing School 1928

She had among her things in her Collection of Junk, a faded letter dated November 1, 1928 from the State of Washington Department of Licensing informing her that they had received her application and fee of $10.00 for the nurses’ examination to be held December 3rd at 9 a.m. in the Stimson Building, Seattle and the Women’s Athletic Club, Spokane. She probably opted to take the test in Spokane since she was living there.

Another faded letter came on December 10, 1928 telling her that she had passed her recent nurses’ examination and gave her grades on the examinations for: Physiology and Anatomy, Gynacology, Hygiene, Bacteriology, Obstetrics, Materia Medica, Surgical Nursing, Dietetics and Pediatrics.  Apparently she was not happy with her grades for she wrote “OUCH.” on the letter.  Her average was 88.3.

She received another certificate which was dated the 4th of December 1928 giving her Nurse’s status per the law.

Becoming a nurse 1928

Becoming a nurse 1928

When I visited Sacred Heart Hospital in 2002, they were displaying in the hallway pictures of the nursing students progressing from the beginning to the end of the school.  I do not know if this display exists anymore.  The nursing school has changed greatly at Sacred Heart along with the buildings and more.

Here is my hubby walking that hallway at Sacred Heart 2002

Here is my hubby walking that hallway at Sacred Heart  Hospital in 2002

Can you find Eddie in the photo below?  She is second from the right top row. Unfortunately, I will not be able to list the graduates names.  The low lights make it difficult to enlarge the picture and you will find it gets fuzzy.

They had a department that covered the history of the hospital so if you want to know more I am sure they would be helpful at Sacred Heart.  I was treated very well when I visited. You will need to make an appointment.  When we visited it was 2002 they an archive but I cannot find it on their website.  You might have to call the hospital and ask about their archive for the nursing school.

The Nurses graduation class of 1928 Edna McDonald is featured

The Nurses graduation class of 1928 Edna McDonald is featured top row on right second in.

Years later Eddie would work in an office down the hall from my mother’s work. My Dad and I would come and pick up my mother up and take her to do the weekly grocery shopping at the Safeway in the University Village which was on the way home.  While she was getting ready, I would head down the hall to visit Eddie.  It was called Seneca Summit Surgery and it was just north of Swedish Hospital on Capitol Hill in Seattle. It closed in the late 1960’s.

My mother, Marjorie, graduated from the Virginia Mason Nursing School in Seattle in 1938 a full 10 years after Eddie.

Eddie was called “Mac” for a nickname.  My dad, Keith, was called “Mac.”  My mother, Marjorie was called “Boardie” before she married my father Keith, and then she was called “Mac” as well.

To learn more about my mother’s nursing experience see my post, Marjorie becomes a Nurse, January 21, 2014, the Boardman and Brown blog:

http://boardmanbrown.wordpress.com/2014/01/21/marjorie-becomes-a-nurse/

Eddie’s Collection of Junk – A Conclusion:

The time as come where I have reached the end of the bulk of Eddie’s Collection of Junk.  I feel like I am the history of Cheney High School’s early years through my father’s sisters and brother.  I do have 3 photographs probably of their graduation pictures for a Velma Ryker, Lucille Chapman and a Mary Snagg that I have not posted who were friends of Eddie.  I am willing to share so contact me and we will figure it out.

Eddie stopped putting things in this book when she graduated from her nursing school in 1928.  She left Spokane sometime after 1930 and headed to Seattle, Washington.  She would take up residence near the waters of Puget Sound in the Alki Beach area of Seattle.  This area is part of the West Seattle neighborhood.  Eddie liked the mountains and the water and I remember many walks with her on the beach near her homes.  She lived in at least three, maybe four apartments in the Alki beach area over the years. Vivian, older sister, migrated from Spokane to Seattle sometime in the early 1960’s and they lived next to each other in a house like duplex on Alki Beach till Vivian was moved to a nursing home.  That house is now replaced with a modern looking apartment.  After Vivian’s death, Eddie continued to live in the downtown area of West Seattle.

There is one more piece of memorabilia to share with you from Eddie’s book.  As you have noticed Eddie’s brother Keith is not mentioned in this series of posts from the Collection. There is one picture that she kept created by Keith and I will share that when I start to write about him in future posts.  Eddie’s brother Keith was three years younger than her so he is just about to enter Gonzaga High School when she was graduating from nursing school.  Can you guess what the picture is…..?

Yes, it is a drawing of an airplane.


Eddie’s Classes At Sacred Heart Nursing School

May 8, 2014

Back in 2002, I made an appointment and visited the Sacred Heart Hospital in Spokane where I was given Eddie’s Nursing School History.  I am not going to share all of what information is contained in the documents, but instead tell you some of the highlights.

Eddie & Friend circa 1926

Eddie & Friend circa 1926 maybe later…

The history given to me included her class work years.  They rated her on absence, attendance, and examinations.

July to September 1925 she was in the Preparatory Course which consisted of the History of Nursing, Nursing Ethics, Principles & Practices of Nursing (Demonstrations given 30).

From September 1925 to 1926 Eddie took: Drugs & Solutions, Anatomy & Physiology, Personal Hygiene, Medical Nursing, Surgical Nursing, Bacteriology and Dietetics.

From 1926 to 1927 she took Pediatrics, Nursing in Comm. Diseases, Obstetrical Nursing, Gynecological Nursing, Anatomy & Physiology.

Then in 1927 to 1928 the courses were Orthopedic Nursing, Eye Ear Nose & Throat Nursing, Materia Medica & Therapeutics, Psychiatric Nursing, Nursing Ethics.

They rated her on lecture work listing her teachers and the lectures she attended.

They also rated her as follows:

    • Health – good
    • Disposition – Excellent
    • Manner – Shy but pleasant
    • Neatness – Fair
    • Punctuality – Good
    • Thorough and Conscientious – yes
    • Able to take responsibility – yes
    • Is she capable and intelligent – yes

Eddie’s Collection of Junk: Cheney High School Freshman Class 1921-22

December 12, 2013

There are many gems in my Aunt Eddie’s “Collection of Junk.” From this point on for many posts to come I will be featuring some of these gems.

One of them is the list of the students for the Cheney High School Freshman Class of 1921-22 and it looks like she wrote it.  The paper is tissue paper and it is very fragile.

These are the types of items that genealogists just go nuts over.  I was at the Tillicum Historical Society years ago in Cheney and they didn’t have much on the high school before 1925.  I believe they are now the Cheney Historical Society?

In the list below, Eddie is number 25 and Jean is 21.  Down at number 43, she lists the officers of the class: President Edna L. McDonald, Vice – Fred West, Sec – Roy Hughes, Tres – Alferd Eixson, Sergant at Arms – Pearl Ragan.  Class meetings 2nd Tues of every month. Class dues 35 cents a semester.  If only there was a photo. HA!

1921 to 1922 Cheney High Freshman Class list

1921 to 1922 Cheney High Freshman Class list

Cheney High School Freshman list 1921 to 22

Cheney High School Freshman list 1921 to 22


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