St-Alexandre Des Chenaux RC Cemetery…Clarendon Twp.

November 21, 2014
St. Alexandre Cemetery

St. Alexandre Cemetery

One of the notes on Duncan D. MacDonald’s charts about Alexander McDonell and Janet caught my eye before I headed out on my trip to Canada in September 2014.  He wrote that they were buried in Stark’s Corner.  It was on Sheet 2-A, Chart 13 of his Part IV Collection of charts book.

I was at the Quebec Family History Society in Pointe-Claire, Quebec looking at their cemetery records for Pontiac County, Quebec and the volunteer pulled this three page typed paper and I got real excited.  This society has a great collection of cemetery records for Quebec.

I have been all over the Stark’s Corner Cemetery records at the Ontario Genealogical Society and also at the Quebec Family History Society and there is no record of any McD’s in this cemetery located in Clarendon Twp., Pontiac Co., Quebec.  This is also not a Catholic cemetery.

Source: Stark’s Corner Community Cemetery, including Stark Family Cemetery, Stark’s Corner United Church Cemetery also known as Stark’s Corner’s Presbyterian Church Cemetery. Recorded August 1991 by Robbie Gorr, Lot 20 A Range 3.  

Here is the link to the Grave Marker Gallery for Starks Corner with tombstone pictures.  There are no McD’s listed.

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cangmg/quebec/pontiac/clarendo/starksco/index.htm

Well…when the volunteer at the Quebec Family History Society pulled this manuscript, I knew it was Alexander and Janet…

Source:  St-Alexandre Des Chenaux Roman Catholic Cemetery (also known as Ste-Melanie de Clarendon Roman Catholic Cemetery). Lot 24, Range 1, Clarendon Twp., Recorded May 1992 by Robbie Gorr.  The title is: The Lone Sentinel of the Past:

Try the Grave Marker Gallery for photos:

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cangmg/quebec/pontiac/clarendo/stalexan/index.htm

This is a story of neglect and abandonment.  This cemetery was abandoned and subsequent owners have plowed up the area.  It is estimated that 100 wooden crosses were once there.  There is now only this one lone sentinel, obelisk left. As far as the article indicates there are no records.  The chapel that was there did burn down but the article states that a transfer of the church and cemetery to Portage Du Fort occurred, and Hwy 303 was built bypassing the area.

These are the grandparents of Janet, who married Ronald son of Alexander John McDonell and Ellen McPherson.  This is the Lundie McDonald connection.

The east side reads of the tall stone reads:

Alex McDonell died Jan. 1, 1842 AE 88 Yrs

his wife Janet died Jan. 14, 1847 AE 84 yrs.

The south side reads:

Their Son Ranald drowned July 18, 1854 AE 68 yrs. 

This article reads:

In 1840 Alexander McDonell donated an eight acre plot of land for a Roman Catholic Chapel and cemetery to be built, the nearest at that time being at Calumet Island.”

The mission of Ste-Melanie continued to be served by the incumbents of Calumet until 1854 when Father Bouvier completed the construction of the stone church…at Portage Du Fort and opened a new cemetery. The log chapel and cemetery at Clarendon were abandoned…The chapel is said to have burned down…”

“When the chapel (finally) was built, it was alongside the road which ran from Aylmer to Portage Du Fort. That road was abandoned in favour of the present Highwy 303 which runs between Portage du Fort and Shawville, nearly a mile to the north of the chapel site, thus making the cemetery a long distance from any public road, out of sight from passerby and inaccessible on private land with the permission of the owners.

Another comment made in the article is the name was changed because of another St. Alexandre cemetery at Sandpoint?

I followed out one of the sources listed:

Lone Sentinel of the Past” by S. Wyman MacKechnie from Ottawa Branch News, Volume XIII, Numbr 1, January-February 1980.”

It is of course the magazine of the Ottawa Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society.  Family History Library had copies and I found the article in a very tightly bounded volume, FHL Book 971-384 D25o V. 13, No. 1, Jan/Feb 1980.  This is a reprint from the Shawville Equity, September 28, 1977 with minor changes by the author.

I found it interesting that in this version the Ottawa Branch News, it was a brother-in-law of Alexander’s that pooled his land with Alexander for the purpose of the chapel and cemetery, not just Alexander donating land as the 3 page manuscript suggests.  This individual received the land from his services in the Battle of Waterloo.  I would like to see the Shawville Equity Article just to see what was really written.

In 2012, when I was touring the Upper Ottawa area and driving from Renfrew city to Portage Du Fort to Shawville, I went right by there on Hwy 303 several times and could have sought out this tombstone. I was trying to identify cemeteries with McD’s in them in the area and I was all over the internet and cemetery books but this one I missed.  I have realized since I came home and did my 2nd tour of Canada that I did not extend my searches wide enough but then I didn’t have a lot of time.

Here are the other sources in the article and I have not been able to find online versions probably due to copyright:

Highways of Destiny, A History of the Diocese of Pembroke, Ottawa Valley Canada, by Rev. Wm. C. O’Dwyer, 1964.

Clarendon and Shawville, by J. Lloyd Armstrong, Dickson Enterprises, Shawville, 1980.

Lift Up Your Hearts, A History of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Pembroke, by Rev. Joseph C. Legree, 1988.

If anyone knows this cemetery, has photos and is willing to share, please contact me and leave a comment


John Mor MacDonell husband to Flora McLellan…

November 13, 2014

In past post I have shared about Ronald and his wife Janet’s story.  She is the daughter of John Mor MacDonell and Flora McLlellan and he is the son of Alexander John MacDonell and Ellen McPherson. This makes Ronald (Ranald) a great great uncle.

Here are the posts I wrote:

  • Revisiting: Ronald (Ranald) and Janet McDonell – The Lundie Family Connection!, August 26, 2014
  • The Ronald McDonell & Janet McDonell Family, September 29, 2011

Mr. Perrault who commented on my the Revisiting post told me that there was a burial for John McDonald at St. Alphonsus.  He was correct, I was so busy getting ready for my trip to Ontario and Quebec that I had tucked away the record on my computer. His comments reminded me of this and so I share it with you.  I found it the other day.  So here is a transcription of the St. Alphonsus Church record.

Burial of John McDonnell

Burial of John McDonnell

John Mor MacDonell and his 2nd wife Flora McLellan

S3 John McDonell, St. Alphonse, Allumette Island, 13 February 1861.  I the undersigned priest of this mission have interred in the cemetery of this mission the body of John McDonell aged sixty-three years died 7th inst. Husband of Flora McLellan present Samuel McDonell, and James McDonell who have not signed.  Jas C. Lynch, Priest.

You can find a shortened version of the burial information:

#1324 McDonell, John 06 Feb 1861 buried 13 Feb. 1861 63 y. h/o Flora McLellon, 89

Source:  St. Alphonsus of Liquori, Chapeau, Allumette Island, Pontiac County, Quebec. Cemetery Inscriptions and Burial Records, by Elaine Brown.

I visited the St. Alphonsus Cemetery (old) in 2012 and stopped by several times but I did not find a tombstone for either John nor Flora but then I was not looking for this couple. There were a lot of missing stones, broken stones and more.

http://macdonellfamily.wordpress.com/2012/05/28/touring-the-upper-ottawa-river-st-alphonsus-of-liguori/

In the 1871 Canadian Census, I found a Flora McDonell living in Chichester, Pontiac Co., Quebec with a Allan and James McDonell ages 34 and 33. She was 62 years old which means she would have been born in 1809. If she is the correct Flora she was 18 years old when she married John in 1827, this date may be in the Perth Marriages, but I have not check them as this time.  She was born in Scotland and is Roman Catholic.  I have not been able to find a Flora in other census at this time.


The Alexander & Ellen Lineage vs. the Angus and Janet Lineage

November 6, 2014

When I started researching my father’s MacDonald surname, I had quite a bit of material to use to get started.  I had two family trees done by my Great Aunt Nellie, sister to my grandfather Ronald (R.S.).  The charts were dated 1932. I had the genealogical notes done by my Aunt Miriam a sister to my father.  I had pedigree charts and my own knowledge of my family.

I started at the beginning and began building and researching my family studying the life of my grandfather Ronald, his marriage to Grace, his siblings and their lives and also the lives of his parents Archibald and Mary McDonell. I was able to build a family history back to Archie and Mary to their marriage in 1861 and the Canadian census of 1861.  I have presented my findings in this blog about the lives my great grandparents Archie and Mary McDonell.

Using Nellie’s charts I was able to find many of the people on Mary’s side of the chart.  I used the census and the St. Alphonsus Catholic Church records in Chapeau.  All of the records pointed to Alexander John MacDonell and Ellen McPherson as the parents of the individuals I have featured on this blog in past posts.  Archie’s side of the family has only revealed one brother, a John McDonell who was living in Sheenboro.  There is a chart of his side of the family done by Nellie.

Mr. Duncan Darby MacDonald’s charts on pages 721 to 735 and specifically the one on page 73A, Chart 13 Sheet 5 – The Kennedy Connection, from his book PART IV is different than Aunt Nellie’s chart. Here is the detail of that book.

A collection of genealogical charts  Part-IV, 3rd Edition, ISBN O-921133-39-1.  Much of the earlier work done by Daniel F. McDonald of Bristol, Conn and other members of his family at Bridgend (Stone Villa) Lancaster.  A second edition was published in 1988 and the 3rd in 1993.  FHL#971.37 D2, book only.  

Here is a copy of my Aunt Nellie’s chart, which I have featured in a past post, just click on the photo below and it will open. There is a series of these posts in which I discuss both sides of the family and my findings.  You can find the posts by search for Nellie’s Charts.  This is the specific post I will be discuss in here, Post dated July 21, 2011 Nellie’s Charts – Her Mother Mary McDonell’s Family!

Alex. Ban McDonell Family Chart

Alex. Ban McDonell Family Chart

Now I cannot republish Mr. MacDonald’s chart here so I will have to recreate it.  He has for Mary, Rachel and Margaret the parents as Angus and Janet McDonell. There is also a brother named Angus.  It is this man who he indicates married Janet Catherine MacDonell.  After his death, she remarried to Thomas Payne.

See this post dated October 20, 2011 – Jennette Catherine McDonell and Her Two Marriages.

Angus & Janet MacDonell

Angus & Janet MacDonell Family per Duncan D. MacDonald Chart 13, Sheet 5 Part IV

You can see my two great grandparents are the pink boxes on the right.  This means, according to Duncan D. MacDonald, that Mary was not a sister to Jennette.  It also means that she is not a sister to Ronald who married Janet, a daughter of John Mor MacDonell and Flora McLellan members of the Lundie MacDonell family.

See my post dated August 26, 2014 “Revisiting: The Ronald (Ranald) and Janet McDonell – The Lundie Family Connection!”

Here is an expanded version showing some descendants.  On the left in the 2nd row Angus, a son, married to Jennette Catherine MacDonell. On the right are my great grandparents Mary and Archibald. Unfortunately, Duncan D. MacDonald does not give any lineage for Archibald.  He does for Alexander John MacDonell and has his wife Ellen McPherson with no lineage.

Duncan MacDonald's version of the Angus & Janet Tree

Duncan MacDonald’s version of the Angus & Janet Tree

Mr. MacDonald would have the following children for Alexander John MacDonell and Ellen McPherson, just click and it will open. Remember to hit your back button to return.

Alex and Ellen as per Duncan's Chart

Alex and Ellen as per Duncan’s Chart

So what is the real story? Who is my great-grandmother Mary McDonell a daughter of?  She is a daughter of Alexander John and Ellen McPherson per her marriage record to Archibald McDonell, from the St. Alphonsus Catholic Church in Chapeau, Pontiac Co., Quebec.

A. McDonell & M. McDonell Marriage

A. McDonell & M. McDonell Marriage

It reads as follows: .

 #M51, #1029798, The marriage of Archibald and Mary McDonell on April 9, 1861 at the St. Alphonse Church.

“St. Alphonse Allumette Island 9 April 1861 after the banns of marriage have beene once published at the prone (?) for mass in this mission between Archibald McDonell of this mission son of age of John McDonell and of Sara McDonell on the one part and Mary McDonell of this mission daughter of age of Alexander John McDonell and Ellen McPherson on the other part – a dispensation of two of the banns of marriage have been granted by us in virtue of a power accorded to us by his Lordship the Right Revd Doctor _______Bishop of Bytown and wherein no impediment have been discovered we the undersigned Priest of this mission have received their mutual consent to marriage and have giving them the mutual benediction at Saint Alphonse Allumette Island on this date aforesaids and on the presence of John McDonell and Rachael McDonell who have not signed.” [____ Lynch,] Priest.

In the 1861 Canadian Census it reads for line 37, pg 2, Allumette Twp., FHL Film #0517406, Dist. 415 through 430E,

Line 36 Allumette Twp. Rachel McDonell, born LC, Catholic, age 23, female. Line 37 Alex Jno McDonell, Farmer, born U.C., Catholic, age 66 male; line 38 Mary McDonell born U.C., Catholic, age 25, female; Line 39, Duncan McDonald, Laborer, born L.C., Catholic, age 19, male; Line 40, Finlay McDonell born L.C., Catholic, age 16, male.

So here we have a Alex Jno McDonell with Rachel, Mary, Duncan and Finlay.  This census does not show a relationship but they are grouped so we can assume some sort of connection.

Rachel died on 8 January 1881.  She is listed in the 1876 to 1886 Register of the St. Alphonse book. She is S1, Her entry reads:

S1 Rachel McDonell, St. Alphonse All. Island, 11 Aug 1881 We the undersigned [    ] have interred the body of Rachel McDonell died 8th Inst. parents were Alexander John McDonell and Ellen McPherson, aged 40 years. Present Angus McDonell and Alexander McDonell who have not signed.  Ja. C. Lynch, Priest. 

Based on these documents, I do not think that Mary or Rachel are the daughters of Angus and Janet.  They are the daughters of Alexander John McDonell and Ellen McPherson as my Aunt Nellie has indicated in her chart.  Other names on the chart all follow the lineage to Alexander John and Ellen.

What about Margaret, well she is a daughter of Angus and Janet. Again in the St. Alphonse church records 1859 to 1876 there is an entry for a death:

Margaret McDonnell, #S52, St. Alphonse Allumette Island, Dec, 23, 1862. We the undersigned priest of this mission have interred in the cemetery of this mission the body of Margaret died yesterday, aged 20 years daughter of Angus McDonell and Genet McDonell.  Present John Connoly & Donald McDonell who have not signed.  J.A. Lynch, Priest. 

I looks like Angus and Margaret were siblings and children of Angus and Janet/Genet.

From the book by Elaine Brown on the St. Alphonse Church there is these entries we see that Angus J. McDonald died in 1866 and the children above are not listed with an Angus, but with Alexander Jno. McDonell.

#A76, Row 3, pg. 4 Cemetery Inscriptions: Payne McDonald, 1) Janet C./McDonald/wife of/Thomas/Payne/died Sep 2, 1916/aged 84 y’rs/rest in peace/PAYNE; 2) Angus J/McDonald/died/July 15, 1866/aged 37 y”rs/rest in peace/

In my post dated March 23, 2010 The Records of the St. Alphonse Church. When I did the research on my family these records were not yet online at Ancestry.com and Family Search and even though the search engine is there it would not give me Angus and Jeanette’s marriage, I had to do it the hard way scrolling through the pages on Ancestry.  I knew the film number and the date so that helped.  Here is their marriage.

Baptisms, Marrriages & Burial Registers of the St. Alphonsus Catholic Church FHL#1029797, 1846-1858 with an additional index 1846-1876,  #M10, FHL#1029797. 

St. Liguoris, Allumette Island, September 26, 1851 after the banns of marriage have been twice published at the [       ] in this mission between Angus J. McDonell of this mission, son of age of Angus McDonell and Janet McDonell on the one part and Jennette McDonell daughter of age of  [  ] John McDonell and Ellen McPherson on the other part. A dispensation of the banns of marriage have been given by us in [     ] of a power accorded to us by his lordship the Right Rev. Doctor Guigues Bishop of Bytown and whereas no impediment having been discovered we the undersigned priest of this mission have received their mutual consent to the marriage and given the nuptial benediction at Liguori Allumette Island on the day of the date above mentioned and in the presence of Thomas McDonell, William McDonell and Catherine McDonell who have not signed.  Jas. Lynch, Priest. 

Unfortunately, Mr. Duncan D. MacDonald does not give sources and if he does only in some places on his charts. I am glad that I have found this information and can now study it and do more digging into the records.

I think I will continue to believe that my Great Aunt Nellie’s chart is correct.

 


Genealogical Education: Returning to the British Institute in 2014

October 13, 2014
Templegrds

2006 Temple Square SLC

Last year in October 2013, I took the Sources for Tracing Pre-mid-Nineteeth Cemetery Ancestors course offered by the British Institute in Salt Lake City, Utah, which is sponsored by the International Society for British Genealogy and Family History. http://www.isbgfh.org/

The course was excellent and one of my teachers appeared on an episode this last year of “Who Do You Think You Are?”  I was very excited when I saw Paul Blake on the show.  http://www.tlc.com/tv-shows/who-do-you-think-you-are

I spent some of the time searching for my Spracklin ancestors in the Somerset and Dorset area of England.  It was very interesting.  My father’s grandmother was Amarilla Spracklin Barclay.  I was also trying to get more evidence for John Keller’s origins, he is a 3rd great grandfather.  I am also making slow progress on the McDonald side in the research and will be posting about those findings in the future.

Family History Library 2006

Family History Library 2006

This year in 2014, I will be attending the Institute again in Salt Lake City and taking Scottish Research: The Fundamentals and Beyond, by Paul Milner.  It is time for me to get serious about Scottish research.  So I am currently in the process of preparing to attend this course and getting ready for the trip to Salt Lake City.  I also plan to take advantage of the opportunity to do more of the family research at the Family History Library.  It will be a very intense week of classes and researching.  So I will be getting back to posting on this blog some time in November 2014 about my findings in Ontario and more.

The Line at opening to the Family History Library

The Line at opening to the Family History Library

This will be my sixth trip to Salt Lake City and the Family History Library.  https://familysearch.org/locations/saltlakecity-library  This library and their online website for their records has contributed greatly to my research successes.  https://familysearch.org/search  I do know of people who go there even more than six times.

2009 3rd Floor Family History Library

2009 3rd Floor Family History Library

At the National Genealogical Society Conference held in Salt Lake City in 2010 Family Search announced that they would digitize their whole collection and it would take 100 years but they had created ways to improve digital transfer so they could do it in 10 years.  I was amazed.  Every time I go to their website it changes and gets better and better and sometimes more complicated.

2013 British Institute

2013 British Institute getting ready…

2013 British Institute Class

2013 British Institute Class

Well it is time to get back to planning for this trip.  One of the requirements is to read a book on Scottish History, so I best go and get my two chapters in.

The History of Scotland,” by Peter & Fiona Somerset Fry, reprinted several times 1997.


New York Wanderings: Fort Johnston and the Mohawk Valley

October 5, 2014

Driving along I-87 through the Adirondacks you come upon names of towns like Elizabethtown, Saranac and the lake, North Hudson, Schroon Falls, and Warrensburg and Lake George. I saw a sign for Lake Placid and Lake Luzerne.

My goal was Johnstown and so I headed out of Warrensburg after getting some gas and checking the oil.

The fog was starting to let up, well not really, and I was soon in Saratoga Springs which I found to be a very wonderful town and really liked the main street area that I saw before I turned west onto Hwy 29.  I suggest Google Images to see sites of this very lovely town. Just put the name of something you want to see into the search engine then click on images.  You can then follow and image out to its original page if you like.

This highway took me through the towns of North Milton, East Galway, Galway and North Galway, Honeywell Corners and Broadalbin.  It was at Broadalbin that I turned south on Hwy 30 and just decided to go into Amsterdam to Hwy 5.  It was easier than what I originally had planned.   Hwy 30 took me through Perth.  Yes another Perth and we are seeing some interesting names of towns in this area.

I followed Hwy 30 through Amsterdam and onto Hwy 5 heading west. This Hwy 5 follows the Mohawk River.  No luck today for photos it was all shrouded in FOG! and the railroad tracks sort of pushed the highway away from the river…darn!  So go to Google Images for some really cool views of this river, maps and all kinds of great stuff.

The town of Fort Johnson came up quickly but it was a little confusing to find the fort itself.  I saw a sigh and turned off by Park Row and then reread the sign and went back out on Hwy 5 till I got to the turn for Hwy 67 going north and there was the Fort right there on the left.  I turned right onto Hwy 67 and pulled into the parking lot.

The bridge to the Fort

The bridge to the Fort

 

The stream beneath the Bridge

The stream beneath the Bridge

The outhouse…no not the bathrooms.

An Historic Privy

A Historic Privy

 http://www.oldfortjohnson.org/

The Visitor Center at Fort Johnson

The Visitor Center at Fort Johnson with a great book shop

Fort Johnson

Fort Johnson – a very large house with many rooms, a large hall area, basement and full attic.

I signed in at the book register, paid $4 for the tour and wandered their book shop which had excellent books.

These CD's look comprehensive?

These CD’s look comprehensive?

Fort Johnson Sign

Fort Johnson Sign along Hwy #5

Fort Johnson is a fortified house with gun ports.  I have read about this type of house in regards to the history of the Goss family.  Philip Goss had a house probably similar that he built-in Huntington Twp. in Pennsylvania.

Mr. Johnson loved big houses and this was huge with large rooms and several floors including a useable attic where he held conferences with the Indians. When Sir Johnson moved to Johnstown his son Sir John Johnson took over this house.

I had a great tour of the Fort and the nice docent answered my questions about the history of the fort and the lives of the Johnson family.  I learned he was Irish and that was very interesting.  He didn’t like his sons first choice of a wife so he intervened to try to arrange a better marriage for John.  Sir John Johnson was a son of William and his first wife.

Here are some links to investigate.  At some point I am going to have to select really good links for Loyalist research I have some but at the moment I am experimenting and exploring.

I visited Sir John’s house in Glengarry on my last trip to Ontario in 2012.  I wrote about that visit here in post dated June 26, 2012:  Touring Glengarry:  Glengarry Archives & the Sir John Johnson House.  Sir Johnson really didn’t live in this house that much or at all, he lived in Quebec and died there.  http://100objects.qahn.org/content/gravestone-sir-john-johnson-1830

Sir William Johnson was a Baronet and had lots of land.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_William_Johnson,_1st_Baronet

This article is about Sir John Johnson the son: http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/johnson_john_6E.html

Mohawk Valley Region Path Through History:  http://www.mohawkvalleyhistory.com/

The Valley Dwellers:  http://www.mohawkvalleyhistory.com/

Sir John Johnson, son of William, had to take the people from the Mohawk Valley to Canada and he did this by going through the Adirondack Mountains in about 1778.  I plotted this route he took based on the article and it was right through the mountains.  I wondered why he would do that but it probably kept the people from being harrassed by the “Rebels.”

http://www.historyinanhour.com/2011/12/19/sir-john-johnson-summary/

This is very interesting as to what happened to the people who settled this area and then had to leave because they were Loyalists who believed in the Crown.

See this article: http://hortonsarticles.org/hh7thousand.htm

Electric Scotland has this great article about the Highlanders who came to the Mohawk Valley. http://www.electricscotland.com/history/highlands/chapter8.htm 

This is a historical account of the Settlement of Scotch Highlanders in America by J. P. MacLean:

http://books.google.com/books?id=Xxem9Kqd0j0C&pg=PA230&lpg=PA230&dq=Sir+William+Johnson+and+the+highlanders&source=bl&ots=64nWDJ94oW&sig=xH0RLS3xeth_JY947KoS0zxE9Xs&hl=en&sa=X&ei=ojoxVJvfEeHWiwLTioGQDA&ved=0CEUQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=Sir%20William%20Johnson%20and%20the%20highlanders&f=false

 


Quebec Wanderings: The Quebec Family History Society

October 2, 2014

The Comfort Inn in Pointe-Claire or maybe it is Lake Heights, is right on a busy street called Blvd. St. Jean and there are many shops like Target and I think I see an IGA.  My window on the 2nd floor looked out on the street so I could watch the cars stream by and the night come on.  I was surprised it was as busy as it was for a Sunday.

My goal on Monday, September 22 was the Quebec Family History Society:  http://www.qfhs.ca/   I hope that the barricade is not going to cause me problems in getting to this society which opens at 10 am.

I headed south on Blvd. St. Jean till I got to Lakeview Blvd. and turned right.  I then turned right onto Waverly Rd. and left onto Salisbury Rd. and it brought me to Avenue Cartier.  It was a great relief to see that I had options for parking in the area.  It was limited by 2 hours but that was okay with me.  I could move the car to another part of the street if I needed.  I found a place on the street going north so I was on the same side of the road as the Society.

My preference is for the streets and country roads but you can take Hwy 40 and or Hwy 20 to Pointe-Claire and the QFHS.  It is closer to Hwy 20.  QFHS  is located on the western side of the Montreal Airport.

I have known about the Quebec Family History Society for years because I purchased from them two cemetery books for Pontiac County years ago.  They also had a table at the Ontario Genealogical Society Conference in Kingston which I had stopped by to visit.

I entered the building and found the door to the archive open so I went on in and a man was seated at a table.  I inquired if they were open because I was about 25 minutes early.  He said yes.  So I went back out to retrieve my computer bag and research.  It was within minutes another volunteer arrived. I signed in and paid my $10.00 research fee as a non-member.

Quebec Family History Society entrance

Quebec Family History Society entrance

Out front of the QFHS

Out front of the QFHS

QFHS Treasures

QFHS Treasures only one room of several…

I was greeted by Jacques and Barbara.  Jacques gave me some tips on the Drouin Collection and made copies of some possible church registers I could study for more clues from a big thick Drouin Book he had.

Source:  Inventaire des 2365 microfilms du Fonds Drouin, tome II, (Inventaire des registres d’estat civil catholiques et autres denomiations) Province de Quebec, partie descriptive (A-M) par Jean-Pierre-Yves Pepin, Les Editions historiques et genealogiques Pepin/Drouin collection Notre Patrimonie national no. 2.  (I did not add the accents). 

Barbara help orient me and I asked her about how the settlers came into Canada.  The St. Lawrence was open from Quebec City to Montreal so they could disembark at both locations. However, after Montreal there were rapids.  She mentioned Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue and that there were locks there. I had just driven through there the day before, darn!  The immigrants would have to take a smaller boat to use these locks to go up the Ottawa River.

http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/lhn-nhs/qc/annedebellevue/index.aspx

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue_Canal

To go further up the St. Lawrence River here is a link that talks about the system today:

http://www.greatlakes-seaway.com/en/seaway/locks/

I can see that this has opened up a whole new world of interesting research for me.  This PDF looks promising.  I need to get back further and into time periods to understand how they used the St. Lawrence to get to other parts of Canada.

http://www.lre.usace.army.mil/Portals/69/docs/GreatLakesInfo/docs/DischargeMeasurement/BlueBook/BlueBook-AppendixB/AppendixB-Part6-StLawrenceRiver.pdf

The reason I am interested in how the immigrants/settlers traveled in from 1780 to 1860 into Canada is because my ancestors must have taken these routes at some time or other.  I will investigate this topic and probably write about it for it is of great interest to me.

Meanwhile I had to focus and get some research done.  I asked Barbara about land records and she encouraged me to go to the Archives of Quebec (ANQ) in Montreal and that they would help. Her encouragement made me feel a whole lot better about visiting that archive.

Their Cemetery Stack

Their Cemetery Stack

The next was to search their cemetery records for Pontiac County, Quebec.  I wanted to look at Starks Corner’s cemeteries. They had two big large binders to go through.  I studied the Starks Corner Community Cemetery in Clarendon Twp., Pontiac Co., Quebec and I did not find any McD’s at all. Barbara was looking through another binder of Pontiac Cemeteries and found a lone monument article.

Source:  St.-Alexandre Des Cheanux Roman Catholic Cemetery (also known as Ste-Melanie de Clarendon Roman Catholic Cemetery) Lot 24 Range 1, Clarendon Twp. recorded 1992.

In 1840 Alexander McDonell donated an eight acre plot of land for a Roman Catholic Chapel and Cemetery to be built, the nearest being…. Calumet Island.  It became the burial place of Alexander McDonell 1842 and his wife Janet 1847.  Their son Ranald drowned and is buried there with them 1854 at age 68 yrs.”

There will be more on this burial in a future post.  I can’t believe I drove right by there at least four times on my trip to the area in 2012.  I was going into Shawville from Renfrew (town) to the Pontiac Archives for several days.  I have no memory of this memorial or cemetery, however, I was targeting the upper areas of the Pontiac and Renfrew County and not really taking a serious look at the lower townships like Clarendon.  Hmmm….I think I need to rethink that strategy.  This is very important news, of course at that time I probably would not have recognized who these people were. This has everything to do with Mr. MacDonald’s Charts in his Part IV book, the charts #13.

They are oriented towards the English-speaking settlers in Quebec but they are expanding their holdings to include the French Canadian research. They go beyond this to the British Isles as well.  You can read their About page for more information.

Barbara pulled as much of the Pontiac County items they had and I did a quick review. Again there holdings were heavy in cemeteries of the county with two big binders to study. I encourage anyone who has Pontiac County, Quebec roots to donate your family tree and your books to them. Here is their website link again, and I have found it to be easy to get around and find things:

http://www.qfhs.ca/about.php

I was having too much fun at the Quebec Family History Society but it was time to make the journey into Montreal.  I am very glad I visited this society.  I gave them a McDonald Booklet based on this blog.  Jacques saw it and mentioned that he had been to my website several times.  I was flattered.

A big thanks to Barbara and Jacques.  They were both very kind and it is a great place to do research. My four hours was not enough time. Sigh!


Ontario Wanderings: The Glengarry area…Again…

September 30, 2014

The highway that follows the St. Lawrence in Glengarry is one of my favorite places.  I like the gentle drive along the waterfront with the St. Lawrence on one side and the houses either on the water or set back.

The St. Lawrence River

The St. Lawrence River

There are little docks, with boats. I noticed that the signs had been updated to reflect the South Glengarry township change.  I still think of it as Glengarry County with the townships of Lochiel, Kenyon, Charlottenburgh and Lancaster.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glengarry_County,_Ontario

The New sign for Glengarry

The New sign for Glengarry

Since I had viewed a copy of Part IV of Duncan’s charts, I didn’t have to go into the Cornwall Public Library and the Cornwall Room.  I had been there in 2012 so I knew what they had and given them a booklet of my McDonald’s side.  I do recommend the Cornwall Room for genealogical research.  http://www.cornwall.ca/en/webadmin/publiclibrary.asp  I do want to warn you that the library’s website it not real helpful but you can go to their local history link and do searches. The Cornwall Room has limited hours so make sure you know those hours before you head out to this library in downtown Cornwall.  Parking is behind the library and you do have to feed the meter. http://library.cornwall.on.ca/

You can read about my first visit dated June 24, 2012 “The Cornwall Public Library’s Genealogical & History Collection.

The Genealogical Society of St. Laurent has moved to the basement of the Cornwall Library and I could go in and see if they were open for business and it looks like they might be keeping Saturday hours. http://genealogieetarchivessaintlaurent.ca/

You can read about my first visit to them in 2012 at this post dated June 24, 2012 “A Gem in the United Counties of S.D.&G: La Genealogie et archives Saint-Laurent Inc.”

I decided I needed some downtime and to rest so I hung around my motel room.  Now I stayed at this motel one night on my trip in 2012.  It is the motel Monte Carlo and it is right on the St. Lawrence River just a little past the main downtown area of Cornwall.  Now it is not a fancy motel but it is so convenient.  It is just beyond St. Anthony St. and a bit before Boundary Rd. and right on Hwy 2.  She put me in room #4 again and fortunately, things had improved since my last visit.  So I was happy.  http://www.montecarlomotel1700.com/  Now if you want breakfast you have to go out.  They did have coffee but I would plan to bring your own just in case.  I did have a microwave and refrigerator.

Motel Monte Carlo

Motel Monte Carlo

The Wharf at the Monte Carlo

The Wharf at the Monte Carlo

Just east along Hwy #2 is the Blue Anchor Bar and Grill.  I had found this restaurant on my last trip and had sat out on their veranda watching the boats go by.  I forgot one thing and that is it was fall this time not spring and it was a bit cool out there on their veranda but I persevered.  http://www.blueanchor.ca/ They are also on Facebook.

Blue Anchor Bar & Grill

Blue Anchor Bar & Grill

The veranda was a little cold

The veranda was a little cold

I had made arrangements to meet with someone at one of the little historical societies in the area but it didn’t work out.   I had hoped to ask a ton of questions but it didn’t happen and I have had a discussion with myself about being more careful.

However, I did get a little drive through the Glengarry area and when I turned off of Hwy 34 onto Hwy 24 and saw these church spires I realized that it was the St. Columba and Kirkhill Churches that I had visited the last time.  I had come south on the Military Road and saw them in the distance and was just blown away.  They were still pretty impressive.

St. Columba Church & Cemetery

St. Columba Church & Cemetery

In Alexandria I wandered around and found this lovely lake and another cemetery The United Church Cemetery.

Mill Pond

Mill Pond

United Church Cemetery in Alexandria

United Church Cemetery in Alexandria

I stopped at Dimitri’s for an early dinner.  It was a little stormy and windy so I ate my early dinner inside   Dimitri is in Summerstown and right on the St. Lawrence.  I decided to try a Greek plate and it was very good.  They said they would be offering breakfast starting in October so you might want to check it out.  Dimitri’s is a little east of Hwy 27 in Summerstown.

Anything having to do with MacDonells is something that I will take a few minutes to stop and study.  There is a plaque on the Hwy 2 for Lt. Colonel John MacDonell (Abercalder).  It is on the south side of the road.  You can pull into Stone House Point Road and park and then walk over to the plaque.  It you get to Rae Road you are either past or just about there depending on which way you are headed.

Plaque for John MacDonell

Plaque for John MacDonell

 

The Plaque for John MacDonald (Abercalder)

The Plaque for John MacDonald (Abercalder)

There are supposed to be remnants of the house he built-in this area but it is all private property so I did not try to venture further.  I did try to peek over the bushes but I could not see anything in the area that might be ruins.  Google Earth just sees lots of trees in the area.

There are lots of historical plaques in the area and one could spend a lot of time driving around and finding them.

http://www.historicplaces.ca/en/rep-reg/place-lieu.aspx?id=13373

Try these links.

http://www.ontarioplaques.com/Plaques_STU/Plaque_Stormont42.html or go here.

http://www.ontarioplaques.com/Locations/Location_DirectoryStormont.html

Here is a list of the posts and dates of my 2012 tour of the Glengarry, Ontario area.  You can find them using the archive box on the right of this blog.

  • At Last! Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry!, June 22, 2012
  • An Overview: Dundas, Stormont and the city of Cornwall, Ontario, June 24, 2012
  • The Cornwall Public Library’s Genealogical & History Collection, June 24, 2012
  • A Gem in the United Counties of S.D.&G: La Genealogie et archives Saint-Laurent, Inc., June 24, 2012
  • Cornwall Community Museum! June 25, 2012
  • Touring Glengarry:  Glengarry Archives & the Sir John Johnson House, June 26, 2012
  • Touring Glengarry: The Nor’Westers and Loyalist Museum, June 26, 2012
  • Touring Glengarry:  Williamstown, June 26, 2012
  • Touring Glengarry:  Dunvegan & The Glengarry Pioneer Museum, June 27, 2012
  • Touring Glengarry:  Alexandria “The Centre of Glengarry,” June 27, 2012
  • Touring Glengarry: St. Raphael’s, June 28, 2012
  • Touring Glengarry: Martintown, June 28, 2012
  • Touring Glengarry: St. Andrews West (Stormont), June 28, 2012
  • Touring Glengarry: Lancaster, June 28, 2012
  • Last Night in Cornwall, A Turn of Events and a lovely view!, June 28, 2012
  • Touring Glengarry: Cornwall to South Lancaster, June 29, 2012
  • Touring Glengarry:  Kirkhill, June 29, 2012
  • Touring Glengarry: Lochiel, Glen Sandfield, Dalkeith, June 29, 2012
  • Prescott, Russell, The Ottawa River & Ottawa!, June 29, 2012

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